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What do I need to do if I want increase the load on my breaker?

What do I need to do if I want increase the load on my breaker?


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Old 07-10-17, 11:22 AM
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What do I need to do if I want increase the load on my breaker?

I'm building a home theater with a lot of electronics in my AV rack and the room. I want to increase the load to this area so it does not trip the breaker every time I turn them on. What do I need to do and consider?

Thank you.
 
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Old 07-10-17, 11:30 AM
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You mean you want to decrease the load.
Increasing the load on a circuit can cause it to trip sooner.

You'd want to add additional circuits to handle the increased loads you're adding.

The A/V equipment should be on it's own breaker.
Room lighting on another circuit.
Convenience receptacles on another circuit.
 
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Old 07-10-17, 11:37 AM
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The amps in my theater have a staggered/delayed start so everything does not power up at the same time. It adds a second or two to the power-up but it prevents the circuits from being hit with a big spike.
 
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Old 07-10-17, 12:11 PM
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So, besides putting on it's own breaker, is the bigger amperage means I can put more loads on that breaker?
 
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Old 07-10-17, 12:16 PM
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I think before doing anything, I'd look at the actual loads. Newer solid state electronics use almost nothing when in operation. Sure giant amps my be a pretty big load, but I'd at least take the time to check. Might be that a single 20A circuit would be all that's needed.
 
 

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