Need outlet for new 240v cabinet saw

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Old 07-14-17, 07:27 AM
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Need outlet for new 240v cabinet saw

Hello All,
Getting ready to invest into a large stationary table saw.
Looking at few models now and not sure of the power requirements.
Some models show 120/230V ...what does that mean? How can it be 120V when the motor draws 20 Amps ??

If I want to setup 30Amp 230V outlet - I am guessing I can just pull AWG6 wires to an outlet that accept 230V plug from 2 x15Amp breakers (one red, one black wire, neutral and ground)

Is that essentially correct ?

thanks

PS: I have done and feel comfortable with single pole, 120V setups...I re-wired multiple rooms at my home from the new panel that was installed by a pro....but I am not really familiar with anything like 230/240V
 
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Old 07-14-17, 08:47 AM
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Single phase or 3-phase? Make sure you get the right one for your service.
 
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Old 07-14-17, 10:24 AM
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The saw's motor can be converted for 120 or 240v use. Less load and smaller wire when running on 240v.

You will most likely need 12-2 NM-b w/gr. The size of the cable is based on the 240v amperage. With 12-2 you would use a 2P20A breaker.

If the saw is approaching 20A then you can use 10-2 NM w/gr. and a 2P30A breaker.
 
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Old 07-14-17, 10:49 AM
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I am looking at 3 different models now....
all the model show single phase.... some are 120/230 but some are only 240V
Motors vary from 15A to 20A max (of course that is the maximum the motor will pull...specs say that on average the motors pulls 10A to 18A depending on model)

So it seems like 10-2 and 2P30A is the way to go.... will cover anything I am looking at?
 
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Old 07-14-17, 12:41 PM
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So it seems like 10-2 and 2P30A is the way to go.... will cover anything I am looking at?
Not really. When running on 240 volts the amperage drops to half of what it would be at 120 volts. For more versatility I would buy the 120/240 volt model.
 
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Old 07-14-17, 01:29 PM
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The saw set up instructions should specify the needed circuit size.
 
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Old 07-14-17, 01:30 PM
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You can run the #10 wire to guard against voltage drop, but still keep the breaker and receptacle the appropriate amperage to match the saw motor. Almost certainly should be a 15A or 20A breaker with corresponding receptacle NEMA 6-15 or 6-20.
 
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Old 07-14-17, 02:44 PM
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A double pole 15 amp breaker is good for only 15 amps. You do not add the handles together.
 
 

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