Proper Garage Door Wiring

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Old 07-14-17, 09:05 PM
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Proper Garage Door Wiring

I recently bought a new home with a detached garage and one of my first projects has been to install a garage door opener (GDO). The mechanical aspect of installing the GDO has been a breeze but what I am struggling with is figuring out how to properly wire the power to the GDO.

To try and make things simple, I will first list out what I know.
1. GDO is a Liftmaster 8500 (jackshaft opener)
2. Power cord is 6ft long
3. There are no outlets within 6ft of the opener for me to connect to
4. There is one outlet that is within 12ft
5. Garage has its own breaker box and it is located on the opposite side of the garage from the GDO

My questions are this:
1. Do I need to run a new line from the breaker box for the GDO?
- does this have to be a dedicated circuit for the GDO?
2. Can I draw power for the new outlet from the existing outlet that is 12ft away?
3. Does the outlet for the GDO have to be GFCI?
4. Are there any rules governing the location of the GDO outlet (Proximity to walls, GDO, ceiling, etc.)
5. What size / type of wire should I use?

Thank you in advance for your help
 
  #2  
Old 07-14-17, 09:24 PM
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You can run power from the existing receptacle to the overhead near the GDO.

The receptacle must be GFCI protected but can not be a GFCI receptacle because the height makes it not easily accessible.

If the existing receptacle is GFCI just run from the load side of it. If it is not GFCI and not protected by a GFCI breaker the receptacle needs to be changed to a GFCI receptacle..

If the garage has finished walls you can fish NM-b cable (AKA Romex) down to the existing receptacle. If open studs you will need to sleeve the NM-b cable with PVC conduit to height of at least 7'4" it can then be run unprotected through the overhead. You may need to use a running board to staple the cable to if running perpendicular to and on top of the ceiling joists or drill holes in the ceiling joists.

14-2 NM-b for a 15 amp breaker. 12-2 for a 20amp breaker.
 
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Old 07-15-17, 05:37 AM
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Hi, if the receptacle for the GDO is on the ceiling it is not necessary to have it on a GFCI circuit, receptacle is considered not readily accessible
Geo
 
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Old 07-15-17, 06:57 AM
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Receptacles in a garage are required to be GFCI protected. This includes receptacles that are not readily accessible. The exception for receptacles that are not readily accessible was removed in 2008 cycle of the NEC. The GFCI is also required to be readily accessible.
 
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Old 07-15-17, 07:40 AM
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Wow, excellent response! Thank you for your help ray2047
 
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Old 07-15-17, 07:44 AM
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Thank you for the speedy replies everyone, I will definitely have to keep this forum in mind when completing all the projects that come up with my first house
 
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Old 07-15-17, 09:09 AM
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Since the Liftmaster 8500 mounts at the side of the door instead of ceiling getting power to it is a common problem. Not cheap but they made a power extender kit: https://www.amazon.com/580LM-Alterna.../dp/B003GYDJ1E - includes a 35' cable.
Installing a new receptacle is the better solution though as this adapter disables a few features on the 8500.
 
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Old 07-15-17, 10:48 AM
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Code or not, ALWAYS place garage doors (especially metal) on a GFCI protected circuit. There have been cases where small children touching a metal garage door were electrocuted.
 
 

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