Outside to inside- conduit and junction box

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Old 07-27-17, 06:56 PM
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Outside to inside- conduit and junction box

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So I am adding 3 lines to my garage. 2x 20amp 120v and one 50amp 240v.
The 50 amp is for a welder

The image above is my 200amp panel. I need to leave the junction box and go left under the window. This means I need to go over the existing conduit. This will all be to 2014 NEC code and permitted.

Here is where it will run after going under the window. I am planning on running it around the corner and up. I will put a junction box near the light and run it inside to the garage.
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My questions.
1. EMT or SCH 80 PVC?????? This is a low traffic area. PVC seams easier. I do not have a conduit bender, but i think I can do it the turns with compression emt fittings if needed and pull turns.

2. How do I cross over the existing conduit after exiting the main panel? So I turn it down to the wall, clamp it to the side of the house, and then making the U type cross over across the pipe? Or do I go straight down out of the box, come out a bit, cross over, then go down next to the house and do the first strap there?

3. When going into the house, with PVC is seems I can use this
12 in. x 12 in. x 6 in. Junction Box-R5133713 - The Home Depot
I am not sure what type of box to use if emt. I need the box to seal around and to go from THNN to Romex.

Thanks for any help. I just bought this house and want to get the garage squared away before we completely tear out the master bathroom. I have a good handle of how to wire inside the garage.

NOTE: I will probably paint over the conduit if it is PVC or EMT.
 
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Old 07-27-17, 07:29 PM
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Can you run SER out of the top and sleeve it up below the eve and run it around and drop down using a sleeve to a LB and have the SER enter directly into the back of a subpanel where you can branch your 3 circuits?
 
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Old 07-27-17, 07:55 PM
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PVC is ok but hard to keep straight in horizontal runs. I'd choose EMT.

You could run your pipe from the garage to the panel. When you get to that PVC use an offset nipple to step over the pipe. An 1-1/2" offset nipple gives you 3/4" of rear clearance. From the offset nipple stay 3/4" off the wall into the bottom of the panel.

You just need to make sure you can out 3/4" from the back of the panel to a knockout.

garvin industries/offset-conduit-nipples
 
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Old 07-27-17, 07:55 PM
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If it was me, I would run a single feeder and install a sub panel in the garage.

I would use EMT, but then I have conduit benders at my disposal. With EMT you would use a steel weather proof box.

Bends/kicks and saddles can be made to PVC using a heat gun (I have even used a BBQ grill) to soften the conduit enough to make the bend. The trick is not to soften it too much to reduce the diameter of the conduit.

To get over the other conduit there are many options:

1) You could remove the existing conduit and add another junction box below the panel, then run conduit(s) from the panel into the new junction box. Then run the existing conduit into the bottom of the box, re-pull the wire and splice the existing circuit. You can the come out the side of the new pull box and run the conduit to the garage.

2) Run the new conduit and "float" it by strapping the conduit to 3/4" or 1 1/2" unistrut.

3) Run a new conduit down from the panel, make a kick and 90 over the conduit. Then saddle (offset) back to the wall on the other side of the conduit.

4) Use mini straps and space it out of the wall with long screws and 1/2" conduit

5) Go up instead of down: Run the conduit along the roof soffit, or even in the roof soffit.

I got more but that will get you thinking.
 
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Old 07-27-17, 08:36 PM
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There are no knock out panels at the top of the panel. I would have run it out that way. The layout of the panel only really allows to go down.

I will probably run a new sub panel now. I was thinking about it, and it just makes more sense for me in the garage.

I like the unistrut bracket. I can go out of the panel, Support with with a "strut" bridge, then go flush against the wall.

I will use emt.

1. Come straight down of the panel with an OFFSET out (away from the wall). This will give me the distance to clear the conduit. Make a 90 degree turn torwards the garage. I can make a unistrut offset bracket to support the tube when it goes over the conduit. Then maybe use 2 offset conduits to get back to the wall? Will I be able to just add a 90 degree pull box near the corner of the house or will I have surpassed the 360 rule?

So it would be offset (90 degree) a real 90 degree, and then 2 more offets (180). So then I can add the pull box near the corner of the house and be fine.

right?
 
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Old 07-29-17, 07:07 AM
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Offsets are not always two 45 degree bends. I will normally bend two 30's as any figuring I need to do is easier. When figuring how to bend, you double your measurement (when doing two 30's) of the offset required to get over what you need. So, if you need to make a 2" offset, you would mark the conduit 4" apart.

You could come straight down out of the panel and put a small piece of unistrut horizontal there to secure the conduit. That way you would eliminate one offset. Then 90 over the conduit and offset to the wall and continue the run.

You could also come out of the panel (box offset) put a kick (one bend) to kick the horizontal leg out to go over the conduit. Then offset back to the wall. Here is a example:

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Doing that will keep you less then 360 degrees.
 
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Old 07-29-17, 05:10 PM
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Looks like I will probably just get a bender. I have done tube bending before, just not for conduit.

I went to home depot and all they had for rain tight fittings (compression type rated for rain) were straight compression to compression and compression to threaded for box.

They had the offset, but it was only set screw type. I would prefer if my conduit did not fill with water.
 
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Old 07-29-17, 08:02 PM
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all they had for rain tight fittings (compression type rated for rain) were straight compression to compression and compression to threaded for box
That should be all the rain tight fittings you would need.

You might be able to rent a bender. If you are running a pipe for a subpanel you will likely need to run 3/4" or 1" conduit depending on the size of the feeder.
 
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Old 07-29-17, 08:27 PM
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Correct, but I was planning on not buying a bender. I will run 3/4" conduit and just buy a bender to make it work.
 
 

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