point-of-use water heater

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  #1  
Old 05-03-01, 08:34 AM
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Do you think it is safe to install a 240V/50Amp water heater on a line that has a pool pump (7.8Amp) and solar heater control (1Amp)? The line has a 60 Amps circuit breaker.
 
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  #2  
Old 05-03-01, 09:19 AM
resqcapt19
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It doesn't look like the original circuit is code compliant. What is the wire size? Please give us all of the details for this circuit.
Don(resqcapt19)
 
  #3  
Old 05-03-01, 11:16 AM
Wgoodrich
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I am with resqcapt19, seems some warning flags are flying on what you said. a 60 amp breaker should not be protecting a pool pump let alone a solar heater. Either you are not explaining in detail or you may have a hazardous wiring design.

Also no other equipment is allowed on a branch circuit that feeds a pool pump. These pool pumps must be with 4 insulated wires if 240 volt and with GFI protection and usually on a 20 amp circuit breaker.

Give us more detail then we might understand more and feel your safety has been ensured.

Wg
 
  #4  
Old 05-03-01, 11:33 AM
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The circuit breakers are two 30 Amp circuit breakers. There are two hot wires and a neutral which I believe are 6 gauge.
 
  #5  
Old 05-03-01, 12:15 PM
Wgoodrich
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A sub panel going to a pool and running a pool pump must have four insulated wires with nothing else on that feeder except that sub panel. If this was a disconnect with only 2 breakers serving that pool pump the same applies only this would be a branch circuit only and nothing else is allowed on that circuit at all. The white and insulated green must be separated in that sub panel or disconnect. The wires going to that pool pump must also be four insulated wires black,red,white, green if this pool pump is 240 volts or three insulated wires black,white,green if 120 volt motor. If this pool pump motor is with a plug and receptacle then that branch circuit must be GFI protected also.

Most likely you on demand water heater is going to take all of a 60 amp circuit 240 volt rated and no room for any other loads on that on demand water heater circuit. This on demand water heater is a big amp hog. It will demand all the circuit can provide. However this on demand water heater will save you money over a normal water heater because it run only on demand versus a water heater cycling on and off 24 hours a day. Check you manufacturer's recomendation as to the minimum circuit size and follow those instructions. Also confirm you have the proper bonding grid as required. This is not an electrical ground but a grid ensuring that all pieces of metal associated with that pool that are 4" square or larger are all bonded together as one entity to protect from any difference of potential considering shock value.


Be sure to have the pool pump wiring design checked by and electrical inspector or by a proven qualified electricians. I suspect you have some safety concerns such as breakers too large for the circuit and improper wiring. Just to be sure you are safe. Remember you are mixing a wet human body, water, and electricity, a very dangerous combination. Ensure proper wiring design on that pool.

Good Luck

Wg
 
  #6  
Old 05-03-01, 12:17 PM
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Thanks for your help. I'll have it checked out.
MS
 
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