Tamper proof with gfci?

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  #1  
Old 09-02-17, 06:56 PM
Q
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Tamper proof with gfci?

Are there tamper proof receptacles with gfci for 15A circuits?
I need to change receptacles in my kids' bedroom to bring them up to safety standards.
I'm actually more worried about my kids partially pulling a plug out and then sticking their fingers on the plug metal pins whilst electricity is still flowing. I figured a gfci would help cut power in this situation...
Tamper proof receptacles only prevent things being stuck in the receptacles.
 
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Old 09-02-17, 07:02 PM
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A GFI device ONLY protects from a device to ground..... or leakage to ground.
It will not trip if a finger is placed across the prongs of a plug.
 
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Old 09-02-17, 07:10 PM
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Are you looking for tamper proof gfi's or just tamper proof receptacles for a gfi circuit ?
 
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Old 09-02-17, 11:31 PM
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Isn't it leakage to ground if current goes through a person?
looking for tamper proof GFI - the circuit is a normal breaker 15A.
 
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Old 09-03-17, 12:15 AM
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Yes... they do make tamper-resistant GFI receptacles.
Leakage to ground is from either prong to actual ground.
From hot to neutral is not the same. That would just be a normal load.
 
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Old 09-05-17, 10:28 AM
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A better example of leakage to ground would be if you have one hand on the metal bath faucet (which is grounded through the plumbing), and touch a hot wire with the other hand. Electricity will (partially) want to flow through your body to the grounded faucet instead of the receptacle. This imbalance of electrical flow will cause a GFCI to trip.

Putting your finger across the exposed prongs will sting from the electricity flowing across your finger, but electricity isn't escaping the circuit. Electricity flowing through the hot and neutral wires are still balanced, which is why it won't trip. This will still tingle, but it isn't as dangerous as above, where electricity flows from one arm - through the heart - and out the other arm.
 
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Old 09-05-17, 11:01 AM
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Here's a link to a plug lock I found:
https://www.amazon.com/LOCK-PLUG-ele...cal+cord+locks

My wife used to own a daycare and I was also concerned with kids pulling out plugs. This one looks like it would be hard for a kid to defeat.
 
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Old 09-05-17, 11:24 AM
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Old 09-06-17, 05:57 AM
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Actually for your application you only require TR be marked on the receptacle meaning Tamper Resistant, the Weather Resistant or WR marked on this GFCI indicates it can be used as an outdoor receptacle. No need to spend the extra money on a GFCI with both TR and WR for your application.
 
 

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