3 wire to 2 wire in 220 breaker

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Old 09-20-17, 12:33 PM
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3 wire to 2 wire in 220 breaker

My son is changing outlet for new range in place of old cooktop. Old cooktop was hardwired in. The new 220 outlet is installed and 3 way wire is now at the breaker box but old 40 amp breaker only has two wires going into it - white and black. New wire has black, white and red. How can he install this. He told me to take a picture of the box with the wires and breakers but I don't know how to attach the picture.

Thanks for any help. We are seniors and now have no way to cook.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 01:00 PM
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Was a new 4 wire cable run from the stove to the panel? If so the red and black go to the breaker. The white and ground go to the neutral bar in the service panel. The receptacle should be 4 prong and the cord changed to 4 wire. A jumper on the stove may need to be moved.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 02:04 PM
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No problem he just bought the wrong wire . What you need is a 2 conductor cable. But you can still use it. Put the black and white on the 40 amp breaker. Put a wire nut on the red, it won't be used. There is no neutral on 220 Volts. The ground wire (bare copper wire) goes to the to the ground bar in the panel. How did you wire the plug, could be wired wrong.
 

Last edited by skaggsje; 09-20-17 at 02:06 PM. Reason: correction
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Old 09-20-17, 03:18 PM
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skaggsje
No problem he just bought the wrong wire . What you need is a 2 conductor cable. But you can still use it. Put the black and white on the 40 amp breaker. Put a wire nut on the red, it won't be used. There is no neutral on 220 Volts. The ground wire (bare copper wire) goes to the to the ground bar in the panel. How did you wire the plug, could be wired wrong.

I believe you misread the post. A new range is being installed and most likely needs a neutral.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 03:19 PM
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The problem is the breaker box. It's an older style meant for three wires. The breakers have two wires and there is only one ground wire. Is the box lacking the extra bus bar for fourth wire or is it just that three wires was the norm?
 
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Old 09-20-17, 03:24 PM
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If the old cook top needed 120V then the connection was an ungrounded connection where the ground wire is actually a neutral. The new way is to have a separate neutral and ground wire. If this connection is made in a main service panel then both the neutral(white) and ground connect to the same bus bar. Are there not other neutrals in that panel connected to the same bar as the grounds?
 
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Old 09-20-17, 03:48 PM
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It doesn't look like there are others. We have an electrician coming in the morning. The box is old and we don't want to electrocute our son!
 
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Old 09-20-17, 06:39 PM
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If a three wire cable was run for straight 240 you would use the black and red. The white would be the unused conductor.
 
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