New Subpanel Questions


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Old 10-09-17, 08:54 AM
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New Subpanel Questions

I've done a lot of in-home electrical work, and it doing work in my home I discovered that all of my basement lights, my sump pump, and my two dehumidifiers are on a single 20A circuit that's shared with the upstairs bathroom! I need to remedy this situation without pulling three new lines from my existing breaker box.

My service is 100A. I want to install a 40A or 50A sub-panel in the basement to supply the lights (15A), sump (20A), basement bathroom (20A), and dehumidifier (15A) and allow for any possible future expansion as well. This will leave the upstairs bathroom on it's own 20A circuit.

So I know what I need to do from a basic level; all the basement wiring is easily accessible, so running the existing lighting and installing new circuits for the appliances to my planned panel location will be easy.

What's hard: Running the #6 wire from the main panel to the basement. Do I need to use conduit, or can I use 6-3 Romex? How do I measure the correct amount of wire? I can buy a roll of 125', but if it's not enough, how do you splice it?

My run has to go from the far wall of the garage, across the attic, then down the shaft next to the chimney (this is the most obvious location, but I am sure I can find another if the chimney shaft is a no-go zone). I plan to secure the new box on the unfinished side (outside) of the basement bathroom by installing a piece of 5/8" plywood to the exposed studs, then securing the new panel to that.

Am I missing anything that could be a potential problem here?
 
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Old 10-09-17, 09:47 AM
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You can use 6/3 Romex if installed as required to prevent it being subject to damage. Such as running along sides of joist, studs or running boards, or through bored holes in joist and studs as long as the wire is not within 1.25 inches of a nailing surface. Roxex can also be placed in conduit sleeves for protection. Splicing can be done in a junction box, but the box must be left accessible.
 
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Old 10-09-17, 10:01 AM
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How do you splice #6? It's clearly too large for wirenuts, and I know just taping it is a bad idea.
 
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Old 10-09-17, 10:22 AM
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I have used Polaris connectors. I used them when I had to splice 6awg wire. Easy to use and clean job too. They need to be in a junction box which has to remain accessible. Roger
 
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Old 10-10-17, 07:59 AM
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Big blue wirenuts are rated for #6 copper. There are also a number of mechanical connectors available.
 
 

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