Hacking? a step up/down voltage converter

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Old 10-20-17, 04:24 PM
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Hacking a step up/down voltage converter?

Hi guys. My house runs on 120VAC, and I happen to need 110VAC for some Japanese electronics at around 2000W. I bought this from Amazon to accomplish the task: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00CLYMMCC

The problem is, the voltage selector at the rear panel does not provide a 120VAC option (2nd image on the amazon product page). It only has 110, 200, 220, 240. But using a multi-meter, I've realized that the converter essential just cuts or multiplies the input voltage according to what is set at the voltage selector. When the actually input voltage is at 120.5VAC changing the voltage selector would result in the output voltage at the front being as follows (there are 110VAC and 220VAC output at the front)

Selector @ 110: 110 outlet yields 120.5VAC, 220 outlet yields 239VAC
Selector @ 200: 110 outlet yields 66.4VAC, 220 outlet yields 132.7VAC
Selector @ 220: 110 outlet yields 60.2VAC, 220 outlet yields 120.4VAC
Selector @ 240: 110 outlet yields 55.2VAC, 220 outlet yields 110VAC

Note again that this is the result I get when I plug it into my 120.5VAC outlet.

So it seems to me that I can just leave the voltage selector at 240VAC and achieve a 110VAC at the 220VAC outlet. However, my question is that is this "hack" safe? Can I count on it to operate stably? Thanks a lot.
 
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Old 10-20-17, 05:22 PM
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Can I count on it to operate stably?
Best guess..... no.

That is nothing more that a step up-step down transformer. The only problem is the way you are using it may not supply you with 2000w. I'm thinking if you put in 120v and leave it set for 240v input..... you will only get 1500w of usable power.

Try connecting your load and see if the 110v sags.
 
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Old 10-20-17, 09:33 PM
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This doesn't sound good.
A: Standard Japanese voltage is 100v so 110 is already exceeding the nominal voltage by 10%.
B: 2000 watts at 110 volts is over 18 amps. Most household receptacles are only 15amp.
 
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Old 10-20-17, 10:28 PM
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Hello Pjmax and Astuff

Thanks a lot for your replies. 2000W was a general consensus on my type of machine. But to make sure, I dug the machine out. It actually is rated for 1460W. And Astuff, you are right, this rating is designated for 100V. I guess this means that I'll have to add 10% to the power rating since I'll be running 110V, correct? That puts it right under 15amps. I hope that this is OK. Thanks a lot.
 
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Old 10-21-17, 07:36 AM
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You would be better off with a buck-boost transformer.
e.g. from https://www.hammondpowersolutions.co...t_Section2.pdf look at the QC35ERCB as it is designed to go from 120 to 100 vac with the correct wiring. https://www.google.com/search?q=Qc35...utf-8&oe=utf-8
 
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Old 10-21-17, 08:39 AM
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Hello Astuff. Thanks for introducing me to that device. A buck-boost transformer is something that I'm not really familiar with to tell the truth. What would be the advantage over the transformer that I already have? Wattage and size? Thanks.
 
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Old 10-21-17, 02:25 PM
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What you are playing with now is giving out 110 volts. Your incoming house voltage fluctuates so can assume that the output of your unit will be above 110 at some point. Your equipment wants 100 volts. It may not burn up at 110,111,112,... but will shorten its life.

It is common to use buck-boost transformers with tanning beds. Take the voltage from 240 to 220. This is for the bulbs that are designed for 220. They work at 240 but need to be replaced frequently.

Also verify that your equipment is good for 60 Hz. Half of Japan is 50 so most is designed for either 50 or 60 Hz.
 
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Old 10-21-17, 07:25 PM
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Great. I'll look into getting this buck-boost transformer. Thanks Astuff!
 
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