4 x 6 AWG in crawl space


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Old 11-01-17, 06:25 AM
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4 x 6 AWG in crawl space

I am running 4 x 6 AWG from my main panel under the house in the crawl space to an outside wall where it will enter liquid tight to a 50A spa sub panel (outside).

Question. do the 4 #6 wires in the crawl space also have to be in conduit?
 
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Old 11-01-17, 06:55 AM
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Individual conductors need to be installed in a complete conduit system .
 
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Old 11-02-17, 06:49 PM
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From the panel to the spa panel needs to be conduit the entire way. You can only have a total of 4 90 degree bends in a conduit run you may need to also add some boxes for pulling points along the way.
 
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Old 11-03-17, 04:30 AM
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Depending on how the joists are running you could run SER stapled or run a running board and staple the cable to that.
Geo
 
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Old 11-03-17, 06:06 AM
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Go it done! With a combination of LFNC (through the sill) and rigid pvc (~30ft). Only 3 90 degree turns. Pic shows the 4 #6 coming up into the box.

Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 11-03-17, 06:14 AM
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The LFNC should be properly connected to the panel with a connector designed for LFNC, not just stuffed into a 2" hole in the bottom. SER also should be properly connected, but that is another issue.
 
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Old 11-03-17, 06:23 AM
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Agree with the above. Connectors are needed for both.
 
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Old 11-03-17, 07:29 AM
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Red face

I was kind-of expecting that response.

This panel has many issues, many of which I have fixed, however, the access from the bottom only has 3/8" knock outs and my flex is 3/4". Suggestions?
 
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Old 11-03-17, 07:53 AM
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A normal panel has both 1/2 and 3/4 knockouts. You should be able to see the concentric rings.
 
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Old 11-03-17, 07:59 AM
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I would used a KO punch to make the 1/2" KO bigger. However a step bit can do a similar job. https://www.harborfreight.com/2-piec...lls-96275.html.

The 2" KO and be reduced down to a usable sizes using reducing washers. (Example: https://www.fastenal.com/products/details/0700658)

Drill a new hole to run the ground wire into the panel.
 
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Old 11-03-17, 08:25 AM
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Tolyn,

Thanks. I'll grab a KO kit today and tackle it.

Re: ground wire, are you speaking of the un-insulated copper wire traveling through the 2" hole too? And once in its new hole does it need to be secured in the hole with something?

I attached a wider pic of the panel. There are some bigger punch outs in the back of the box but none (that I see) in the bottom.

FYI - Also I was asking about this panel in an earlier post when I started this project...

Spa subpanel install in an older house
 
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Old 11-03-17, 11:23 AM
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FYI - Also I was asking about this panel in an earlier post when I started this project...
I thought that panel picture was familiar. In your other post I mentioned the Square D Homeline single pole breaker and Eaton breaker that should be replaced. Now I also see a 2 pole Homeline breaker that needs to be replaced. Did you just add the 2 pole Homeline breaker?
 
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Old 11-03-17, 11:57 AM
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Gotcha. I will replace. Can you explain to a novice a quick reason those breakers should be replaced?
 
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Old 11-03-17, 12:14 PM
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The breakers are tested and listed with the panels they were designed for. While some may fit in other brands they may not fit properly. It is a technical code issue that equipment is used as designed and listed.
 
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Old 11-04-17, 08:13 AM
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Gotcha. I will replace. Can you explain to a novice a quick reason those breakers should be replaced?

Square D breakers are only UL Listed for use in Square D panels.
 
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Old 11-05-17, 05:31 PM
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Re: ground wire, are you speaking of the un-insulated copper wire traveling through the 2" hole too? And once in its new hole does it need to be secured in the hole with something?
.
Yes. Normally the bare ground wire does not need any type of connector entering a panel. I normally run it through a KO or drilled hole.
 
 

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