Pool-type air switch for garbage disposal


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Old 12-03-17, 02:35 PM
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Pool-type air switch for garbage disposal

Hi guys,

I have built an outdoor kitchen/cooking space for a cabin we have up north, and the stainless bench I bought to mount on the frame came with a garbage disposal unit which I figure I might as well get going. It comes with the plunger end of an air switch but is missing the slave end of the switch, if you want to call it that - i.e. the box that the air-hose connects to which does the switching.

The hardware shop wants $160 for a new one which is more than I've spent on the whole build so I'm wondering if I could get away with a pool-type air switch, which is only $20. Can I knock out a tab in a junction box and mount the air switch inside that? The unit will be inside the cabinet, which will be outdoors, but under shelter (wall and roof). There is an RCD in the circuit of course.

For the sake of conversation, would it be code compliant if it were setup like this in a household? And more importantly, have I overlooked any safety issues doing it this way?

See attached images for examples of the two devices I'm talking about.
Thanks in advance as always!
 
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Old 12-03-17, 07:02 PM
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I'm not familiar with Canadian wiring. I would just buy a new sink top switch. Here's a link to the US version:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/InSinkEr...SOSN/300432614
I would not want to deal with any solderless connections, like shown on the top switch picture.
 
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Old 12-03-17, 08:36 PM
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I'm in NZ at the moment actually back and forward between the two, so it's be NZ code, which I'm sure doesn't help any more haha.

The item you have quoted is expensive in NZ. Joys of an ocean locked country. I could buy on eBay but have not had much luck with delivery times or even success, lately.

I could always the solder the tabs on, is that the biggest safety issue?
 
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Old 12-04-17, 08:12 AM
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I'm speculating, but the pool switch looks like the same as the ISE switch, only the terminals are exposed and it needs to switch a receptacle.

So to me it looks like it would work. It needs to be rated at your local voltage and amps and you switch the hot wire only, never a neutral.
 
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Old 12-04-17, 09:43 PM
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As far as a switch receptacle goes then is a standard receptacle ok to drill into for the size of the switch? I doubt I'll find one with a circle hole stock. It's rated for 240v 16a plenty for a disposal unit
 
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Old 12-05-17, 07:52 AM
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You can't adapt a receptacle or cover. You would need two separate wiring boxes, one for the receptacle and one for the switch.
The power would go to the switch first and the switch box would feed the receptacle. Remember to not break the neutral, only hot is switched.
Something like this photo cell for dusk to dawn:
 
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Old 12-05-17, 12:46 PM
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Are you saying it would be code compliant, in America at least, to use a receptacle that wasn't intended for this switch to fit the switch into?

Afraid to say it will probably be the undoing if this idea, I can't think of any receptacle at our hardware stores that would fit this, maybe a coax interface or something. If I'm having to buy online/overseas I'll just bite the bullet and get the whole unit.

In reality, stuffing the switch into photo cell receptacle isn't as safe as drilling a correctly sized hole in a sealed junction box for the switch, wouldn't you agree? Anyway...

I realise hot must be switched not neutral too, thanks!
 
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Old 12-05-17, 01:42 PM
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I think your terminology is causing confusion. By "receptacle" do you mean an electrical outlet that the disposer will plug into? Or do you mean the box that would usually contain a receptacle outlet?

If the former, then you could use a 2-gang electrical box with the outlet mounted in one bay and the air switch mounted on the cover plate in the other bay. All wiring would take place in the box. Hot,, neutral and ground entering. Hot connected to air switch and then switch connected to hot side of outlet. Neutral connected to outlet. You would need a cover plate that has outlet opening on one side and blank on the other that you could drill to fit the air switch.

If the disposer is hard wired, you only need a single gang box with a blank cover plate unless local code requires a disconnect switch. All wiring in the box. Hot, neutral and ground entering, hot wired to air switch and disposer hot to the other side of switch. Neutral directly to disposer wire.

If disconnect switch is required, follow first procedure with disconnect switch in place of receptacle. Disconnect switch wired ahead of air switch, i.e. incoming hot to disconnect switch, load side of disconnect to air switch, load side of air switch to disposer hot. Neutral direct to disposer.
 
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Old 12-05-17, 05:13 PM
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I agree there is some confusion. Do you know how to wire a typical wall switch to a ceiling light?
If so, all you need to do is install the air switch in one box and install the plug-in receptacle in another box.
The only reason I posted the picture was to show the cover plate. Treat the air switch as a simple on/off switch.
 
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Old 12-05-17, 11:23 PM
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I am not at all confused about the circuit involved Im only asking about what is required as far as protection goes. The description 2john gave sounds like a perfect solution but I thought you stated you are not allowed to adapt a cover plate? I assumed this means drilling is a no-no? Otherwise that is exactly what I'm after.
 
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Old 12-06-17, 02:03 AM
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Yea, I think you are good to go. 2john explained it well, just use the plate he described and drill the hole for the switch.
 
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Old 12-06-17, 01:15 PM
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Great thanks a bunch I'll get the switch on the way.

Thanks again!
Josh
 
 

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