208 Volt Single Phase

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Old 12-10-17, 12:53 PM
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208 Volt Single Phase

I come here in hopes I can get a quick answer before buying this equipment. I am interested in a Hobart food Mixer that is rated at 208 Volt, Single phase. I would like to use it at home. Is it possible, or do I need an UP converter to bring it to 220 volt, etc? The 208 volt tag does not say 208-240, just straight 208 volt. I am hoping I can use it at home, cross my fingers!!

Any help would be mist appreciated!

Thank you

Ed
 
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Old 12-10-17, 01:03 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

We have 240v in our homes in the U.S. not 220v.
208v is what is obtained from three phase service.
That Hobart machine should run on 240v just fine.

You can always post the equipment model number for further info and 100% confirmation.
 
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Old 12-10-17, 01:31 PM
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Yes, but my Hobart's tag description is single phase, 208 Volt, and not a 3 phase. Therefore, it will run on my residential 240 volt system?

Thank you much!

Ed
 
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Old 12-10-17, 02:22 PM
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Usually it can be found in the technical info on the appliance.
That's why I was looking for a model number.
 
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Old 12-10-17, 02:50 PM
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208-V, single-phase is commonly encountered in the U.S. - mainly in commercial situations. It is derived from a delta-connected, 3-phase utility xfmr. The connection also provides 120-V single phase from a center-tapped phase winding.

Many appliances are rated 240/208V. Call the manufacturer and verify that 240V is OK. It probably is - and will draw a bit lower amps and run cooler than at 208.
 
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Old 12-10-17, 03:13 PM
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It is derived from a delta-connected, 3-phase utility xfmr.
Normally a Delta connected 3 phase service is 240 volts phase to phase, while A and C phase is 120 volts to ground. B phase is your high leg and will be about 208 phase to ground.

A wye connected 3 phase service will be 208 volts phase to phase, 120 volts phase to ground on all phases.
 
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Old 12-10-17, 03:50 PM
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If it is rated for 208 volts and not 240 volts also then 240 volts is an overvoltage condition that can shorten its life.

Find out what voltage it is rated for rather than just try things.
 
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Old 12-10-17, 04:10 PM
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I think I was told that if its rated for 208 only, that I need a step-down transformer to be used on 240: 1 Phase Buck & Boost Step-Down Transformer - 236V Primary - 208V Secondary at 26.6 Amps - 50/60Hz - Larson Electronics
 
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Old 12-10-17, 04:32 PM
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Typically, voltage +/- 10% is considered within tolerance and is OK. I would just call Hobart and check with them. If they do say it needs to be 208 then yes, you will likely need a Buck/Boost xfmr.
 
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