Proper way to crimp solderless connectors with this tool?

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Old 12-23-17, 04:22 PM
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Question Proper way to crimp solderless connectors with this tool?

I had a cheap ratcheting crimper that broke but I think I found a better tool anyway.

I now have a Channellock 908 wiring tool. It is an older version without the Coax part.

I have not tried it yet but I think I just put the connector in the jaw of the tool and squeeze until the connector is tight?
What part of the jaw am I supposed to use? and what is the "Insulation Only" and the "7-8MM Auto" part for?

Thanks

PS:
I am using the insulated connectors

I mostly use the Red connectors (22-18 AWG) and the Blue connectors (16-14 AWG)
 
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Old 12-23-17, 04:29 PM
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You'd use the insulated/non-insulated jaw.

Those crimpers are..... ok.
I use a ratcheting crimp tool and the Klein 1005. Nice long handles. Very strong.

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Old 12-23-17, 04:53 PM
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You use the end to crimp the wire into the metal sleeve.

I was taught to also crimp the plastic insulator section in addition. But I know many do not.

Notice that yours is labeled insulation and non insulation.




 
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Old 12-23-17, 07:26 PM
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I found that this type of crimper tends to damage plastic insulation. Surface area is just too narrow and it cuts into the plastic.

Crimper suggested by PJmax works better.
 
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Old 12-23-17, 08:11 PM
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The 7-8 MM Auto position is for automotive spark plug wire terminals.

Honestly, if you are doing any amount of terminal crimping you really need to get a ratcheting tool. You can get a fairly decent one with interchangeable die heads for less than $30 on Ebay. If you do lot of crimping then you will want an American made tool and they cost significantly more. I have several ratcheting tools and I wouldn't be without them.
 
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Old 12-23-17, 08:26 PM
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Here is the one I was using

I still have it but now it will not crimp the connectors tight enough, There is a screw that rests against the piece that controls the tightness of the crimp but I am afraid to tighten it as it is a soft metal and I don't want to shear the head off.

If I could find another screw that is a harder metal I would use that tool again.

I agree ratcheting tools are the way to go

I would say I don't use the tool alot but when I do I often crimp a whole bunch at a time and then not use the tool for months at a time and then repeat the sequence
 
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Old 12-23-17, 08:52 PM
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This is my favorite. https://www.digikey.com/product-deta...7486-ND/297745

No, I didn't pay that much for it. I got it at the company surplus store for about five bucks. I guess it could no longer pass the QC certification. Still works better than any other crimper I have owned. I also have a Sargent and a Paladin or Amphenol or something that is a good tool. Both of them were north of $50 as I recall.

The one I got from Ebay was to be able to crimp the itty-bitty pins for Molex connectors but it included four or five different heads. It works well for regular insulated terminals. I think I paid about $25-28 for that one.
 
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Old 12-23-17, 11:48 PM
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My lineman pliers have a crimp did built in. I don't like the stripper crimper combination tool.
 
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Old 12-24-17, 07:50 AM
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That tool should work just fine.
The spot to use for crimping is labled "crimp".

Just give the wire a gentle tug to make sure the connection is secure.
 
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Old 12-24-17, 10:05 PM
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Exclamation

Originally Posted by CircuitBreaker View Post
Here is the one I was using

I still have it but now it will not crimp the connectors tight enough, There is a screw that rests against the piece that controls the tightness of the crimp but I am afraid to tighten it as it is a soft metal and I don't want to shear the head off.

If I could find another screw that is a harder metal I would use that tool again.

I agree ratcheting tools are the way to go

I would say I don't use the tool alot but when I do I often crimp a whole bunch at a time and then not use the tool for months at a time and then repeat the sequence
OK I found a screw for my Harbor Freight tool
I also work on computers so I checked my screw box and I found one that fit and that screw is an M3 screw (Metric No surprise there)

I believe those screws are zinc plated steel anyway that tool is back into action
 
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