Up sizing pvc conduit

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Old 12-30-17, 07:12 AM
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Question Up sizing pvc conduit

I'm not sure if there's a fitting for adapting a smaller conduit diameter to a larger one. Looks like reducer bushings are more common anyway. Based on the parts I've seen, maybe there would have to be a box or conduit body in between to facilitate up sizing with common parts, or am I missing something? Just wondering how interchangable this stuff is... perhaps a reducer would fit in a coupler, and another reducer into that, but the size through the coupler might be reduced (or stepped down on one end to step up on the other).
 
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Old 12-30-17, 07:19 AM
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What is your question?......................................
 
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Old 12-30-17, 07:21 AM
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Why do you want to up size the conduit? You will still be limited to the smaller conduit as far as what wire you can pull in it. Or are you using it for something other then electrical?
 
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Old 12-30-17, 07:33 AM
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Mostly a question of interchangability. Other kinds of pipe like for plumbing or pneumatics have adapters that step up in size. Maybe it could be useful when using different types of conduit together, like pvc and flexible, if one was easier to work with in a larger size. That isn't what I'm trying to do now, just wondering if I missed something there, looking at the parts.
 
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Old 12-30-17, 12:12 PM
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Most case you can change from one type of conduit to another with a special fitting or using a rigid coupling and two connectors.
 
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Old 12-30-17, 02:17 PM
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Okay. Looks like the conduit body or junction box is there for scaling things up then (among other tasks), with a reducer on one side or different sized knockouts, hole saws, something like that (because I was looking at junction boxes which had no holes too). As for "why would you want to", well it all depends, maybe it won't come up. However, it couldn't be uncommon to scale up something or other, since there are reducers, but I guess that's about it... sounds a little backwards though, so I had to wonder.
 

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Old 12-30-17, 03:20 PM
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You often see different sized conduits being used in commercial installations. It's often used to run a number of wires to a central location into a box, then branch off into multiple smaller conduits. But it's mostly done in a box, since there's really no reason to change conduit size in the middle of a run.
 
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Old 12-30-17, 03:33 PM
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Thanks for the info. Hypothetically, I'd think that space could be a factor. Maybe you'd prefer to use a larger conduit for most of the way, but there's not as much room somewhere to secure it well, and working with a smaller conduit there would be best, as long as it was sized appropriately for the wire. Then you wouldn't have to rake that wire through the smaller size all the way, because of that one area. Or at least using larger brackets would make it more secure, as they can take larger screws, but not necessarily in every location.
 
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Old 12-30-17, 07:11 PM
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Maybe you'd prefer to use a larger conduit for most of the way,
Usually the size of the conduit is dictated solely by the wire size and is usually kept as small as as possible. I guess if cost was not an object or you had some surplus you could use larger conduit.
 
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Old 12-30-17, 07:29 PM
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Use larger conduit just so we can use larger screws on the brackets? electrialdocius, I'll give you this: You start some interesting threads.
 
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Old 12-30-17, 09:16 PM
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This is a big'n . . .
 
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