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Is this allowed in kitchen


Derstig's Avatar
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02-12-18, 04:30 PM   #1 (permalink)  
Is this allowed in kitchen

Right above the sink/ below the cabinets, from the wall there is an opening that BX cable comes out. This was attached to a broken florescent fixture which I replaced with LED fixture today. Because the old cloth conductor wires inside BX arent 90C rated, I had to put a small junction box where I transitioned from the old cable to romex and then romex into new fixture. Between the junction box and the new fixture there is 1 of romex visible but this is under the cabinets not easily accessible.

 
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02-12-18, 05:51 PM   #2 (permalink)  
It is okay as long as it is not subject to damage and it sounds like it is in a safe spot. I assume the Romex is clamped at the jbox and clamped where it enters the light fixture. You are saying 1 inch, not 1 foot. People have a tendency to get " and ' mixed up.

 
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02-12-18, 05:58 PM   #3 (permalink)  
It is safe as long as it was done correctly.

You must use metal junction box with proper connector for BX cable. That way you have ground connected. Then NM (Romex) ground should be connected to the metal junction box.
You also need a bushing at the end of the BX cable to protect wires from sharp edges of BX sheathing..

 
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02-12-18, 06:25 PM   #4 (permalink)  
Here is a picture showing how I did it. The BX cable enters the metal junction box via BX clamp (not visible on the picture - though if you look closely the bx cable is visible behind the wall which I will fix with drywall joint compound). There is a ground screw in the box which the ground pigtail and romex’s ground conductor ties. So I did everything like you guys have said I think.

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02-13-18, 10:27 AM   #5 (permalink)  
Seems OK to me..........................................


Good luck with your project!
-Ben

 
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02-13-18, 10:49 AM   #6 (permalink)  
Just curious. DId the fixture have a 90 deg warning label on it? Rather surprised a LED fixture would get that warm.

 
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02-13-18, 02:08 PM   #7 (permalink)  
Posted By: telecom guy Just curious. DId the fixture have a 90 deg warning label on it? Rather surprised a LED fixture would get that warm.
Yes it does I'm afraid. Every single LED fixture I bought had it, regardless of wattage/lumens. It does not get anywhere near as warm, measured by my laser temperature gun, its about 75F. However, given how old my house is and how bad the electrical system is in general, I want to make sure every thing I do electricity wise is as close to NEC code as it can be just in case one day I have to file an insurance claim etc.

I know it looks ugly as hell, but wife doesnt mind it. Also, the BX cable's connection adapter is too big to fit to the fixture's. None of the fixtures I found for under cabinet lighting (which by definition imply they are thin, height is usually 1.5" or so) have knockouts that are very small (they have their own custom knockout adapters which can only accommodate romex).

 
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02-13-18, 02:14 PM   #8 (permalink)  
I know it looks ugly as hell
You could cover it with a piece of PVC pipe cut in half, or a cardboard tube painted or covered with Contac paper or tape. Also paint the box. Or just spray paint the whole mess.

If you have to do something like that again, use an offset nipple. https://www.mscdirect.com/browse/tnp...iABEgKlovD_BwE


Last edited by 2john02458; 02-13-18 at 02:17 PM. Reason: additional suggestions
 
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02-13-18, 02:17 PM   #9 (permalink)  
Posted By: 2john02458 You could cover it with a piece of PVC pipe cut in half, or a cardboard tube painted or covered with Contac paper or tape. Also paint the box. Or just spray paint the whole mess.

If you have to do something like that again, use an offset nipple. https://www.mscdirect.com/browse/tnp...iABEgKlovD_BwE
That's actually a very good idea, thank you. I was going to cover the wall (the wall has a giant hole which showed up when I removed the old florescent fixture) with drywall compound which will make a big mess. I can do the painting there at the same time.

 
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02-13-18, 02:37 PM   #10 (permalink)  
Drywall compound in that big a hole will not work well or look good. Why not use a piece of painted wood trim?

 
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02-13-18, 02:50 PM   #11 (permalink)  
Posted By: Derstig Here is a picture showing how I did it. The BX cable enters the metal junction box via BX clamp (not visible on the picture - though if you look closely the bx cable is visible behind the wall which I will fix with drywall joint compound). There is a ground screw in the box which the ground pigtail and romex’s ground conductor ties. So I did everything like you guys have said I think.
Never really looked into that, where can I get a wood trim thats really thin because I cant have it be too thick. I think what I would need is what they use to cover the back of the cabinets. Not sure who sells them.

 
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02-14-18, 09:48 AM   #12 (permalink)  
You can find trim strips that are 1/4 inch X 1.5 inch (and possibly 2.5 inch) in the trim section of big box stores and at lumber yards. They sell it by the foot so you can measure how much you need and cut it to length in the store. You will also find quarter round, cove, and other profiles that might meet your need.

Nail or glue it with construction adhesive or caulk.

 
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