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Power To Shed


johnmc427's Avatar
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03-26-18, 03:00 PM   #1  
Power To Shed

I have buried conduit already what wire can use ?I;ll be running to lights,have like 10 outlets and drill press at times and table saw?

 
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03-26-18, 03:20 PM   #2  
Posted By: lambition ...... Otherwise, you have to dig 18". If there is 2" concrete over the trench or have GFCI protection on the circuit it can be 12" (6" with GFCI protection).
The shallower depth allowance for GFCI protection only applies to circuits that are 120V and no greater than 20 amps.

 
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03-27-18, 03:09 AM   #3  
I have buried conduit already
A bit of "the cart before the horse" here.

Would not have run conduit just yet until you determine what size line to the shed needs to be run. Also, some times easier to feed the conductors thru the conduit as you build/bury the conduit depending on the size of the conductors. Also, the size of the conductors may be determined by the length of the run. About how far is the shed from the house where the shed would be getting it power from.

What size conduit did you run and what type did you run?

With the tools you mention it seems to be more like a work shop. I would have run one feeder to the shed and placed a sub-panel in it. Then run your individual circuits. If many power tools will be running on the outlets I would break up the outlets into as many circuits as possible. I realize you may not use all the tools at one time but still more convenient to use more circuits. But over all the important thing is the main feed to the shed. Also if you will put a sub out there it must be 4 wires going to the shed. 2 hots, neutral and a ground.

 
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03-27-18, 05:42 AM   #4  
Posted By: AFJES .......... Also, some times easier to feed the conductors thru the conduit as you build/bury the conduit depending on the size of the conductors.

It may be easier but against NEC. Conduit systems are to be complete before pulling wire.

 
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04-02-18, 08:24 PM   #5  
The shed is about 120 ft from the house panel.I ran gray 3/4 inch pvc conduit .

 
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04-02-18, 10:56 PM   #6  
I'd suggest running four #10 (one black, one red, one white, one green) THWN. Then you can either use it on a 20 amp DP breaker to give you a multi wire circuit with two 20 amp 120v circuits or use a 30a DP breaker to feed a subpanel at the shed. You could start at the simple multi wire circuit then if you later needed more power switch easily to a 30 amp subpanel.


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04-03-18, 03:32 AM   #7  
Can i run it from a 50 amp brecker that i have in the house panel to a 50 amp sub in the shed and use that?Then break it up in the sub on differant circuits to run lights,boxs and small a/c unit?

 
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04-03-18, 03:57 AM   #8  
Can i run it from a 50 amp brecker that i have in the house panel
Technically yes but you will need three#6 and one #10. " conduit is rated for up to four #6 but it would be a hard pull.

to a 50 amp sub
You could use a 60 amp (no 50a panels) breaker panel at the shed but a 100 amp main breaker panel would give you more room for breakers and the included 100 amp main breaker would act as the code required disconnect if you have more than six branch circuit breakers. (You could still feed it with a 50 amp breaker because the size (amps) of the subpanel can be larger than the supplying breaker.) Note you can usually get a main breaker kit with an assortment of branch circuit breakers at a cheaper price than other choices with no included breakers.


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04-05-18, 07:56 PM   #9  
can i use #10 wire for this project?

 
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04-05-18, 09:08 PM   #10  
can i use #10 wire for this project
#10 is rated 30 amps maximum.


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04-16-18, 05:14 AM   #11  
I have buried 3/4 gray conduit to my shed would like to run power to it.I have#10shredded thhn wire but if that not good let me know?II would like to power small window unit 5000 btu,maybe 6 outlets,3overhead led lights ,some tools like drell press a sander,garage dooor opener,air compresser no 220 on a 50 amp breaker from house panel?I would like help with what wire to run and what size sub panel at shed that 120 feet away?thanks

 
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04-16-18, 05:33 AM   #12  
Please read the preceding posts. As written you can not run more than 30 amps for #10. You need #6 if you use a 50 amp breaker at the house.

From previous post #8:
Can i run it from a 50 amp brecker that i have in the house panel
Technically yes but you will need three#6 and one #10. " conduit is rated for up to four #6 but it would be a hard pull.


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04-16-18, 07:17 AM   #13  
You can use #8 THHN/THWN in conduit and still use a 50 amp breaker. #8 THHN/THWN is good for 50 amps at 75 degree column. It will be easier then #6 but still might be tough to pull, but it is doable. Conduit run must be continuous!
Even though you do not need 240 volts, by pulling in one extra wire (hot, hot, neutral, ground) you will double the capacity to run everything you need. So in this case you need 3 #8's (one wire should be white) and one #10 green.

Sub panel in shed does not need to be 50 amps, it can be larger (IE 60 amps, 100 amps) It just needs to be the same or larger then the breaker feeding it.


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04-17-18, 09:58 AM   #14  
At 120 feet from the panel, you will run into voltage drop problems. The 10 gauge wire can still use a 30 amp breaker but you will get significant voltage drop above 20 amps. Eight gauge wire will give you about 30 good amps. Six gauge wire will give you about 50 good amps.

 
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04-17-18, 02:25 PM   #15  
Even at 120' the voltage drop will not be significant at normal expected loads.


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