220v 50 amp circuit split

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-12-18, 08:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
220v 50 amp circuit split

okay. Background story. I have a 220v 50amp line installed into the garage for a car charger. runs 5 hours a night @ 40amps. i recently bought a table saw (220v 13amp) and a dust extractor (220v 9amp). i am moving in a year when my wife recovers from her leukemia. I dont want to pay to have two other lines run for a such a short period of time. The cost issue arises because the breaker box is on the opposite side of the house which drives the price up alot. Once i move i will run separate circuits. i made a thing a ma jig and want some opinions See attachments. So the middle box i ran a 220v 50amp cord into it. the other boxes have a 220v 20amp outlet with 12 gauge wires ran into the center box and wire nutted into the cord. no outlet should be able to draw more than 20 amps so combined im at 40 amps. Reality is if the table saw and dust extractor run at the same time it should theoretically max pull 13 + 9 =22amps. Correct? i didnt chain them because then the amps would stack from outlet to outlet and 12 gauge wire wouldnt be enough. My last question would be which wire on the 4 wire cord would you lose? I had bought this https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and used it with my table saw for a month or so until the dust extractor came along. When i checked it had the the ground going to the bottom and the white common had dropped off. As you can see from the pics i ran the green wire from the cord to the ground on the outlets and capped off the white wire from the cord.

The reason i went this route rather than hard wiring another outlet of the original was to ensure i cannot have my car charger plugged in with any tool at the same time with a chance of overloading the circuit. if there are any electricians out there what do you think? I haven't tried it out yet.
 
Attached Images   

Last edited by mrjpsmith; 04-12-18 at 08:53 PM. Reason: add words
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-13-18, 05:33 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,306
Received 36 Votes on 34 Posts
While it will work, Technically it is illegal as far as I know.

The better solution is to install a sub-panel in the place of existing car charger outlet. Then you can install 1 50A and 2 20A 2 pole breakers inside. Now you don't have to deal with this adapter and your table saw and dust extractor can be plugged in all the time.
Plugging car charger at the same time may trip 50A breaker running to the sub, but this still is legal.

If the electrician pulled 6-3 NM-b you can replace the breaker with 55A or 60A. 6 AWG NM-b is rated for 55A, but you can install a next size up breaker since 55A is usually not available. That way you can get the most out of existing circuit.
 

Last edited by lambition; 04-13-18 at 05:55 AM.
  #3  
Old 04-13-18, 05:55 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 8,591
Received 29 Votes on 27 Posts
Also when you move it will be easy to take with you when you move. Just put your old outlet back.
 
  #4  
Old 04-13-18, 06:41 AM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: United States, Virginia
Posts: 1,253
Received 32 Votes on 26 Posts
The green wire in the cord is ground and should be connected to the box and the grounds on the outlets. The cord white wire is neutral and is not used for just 240V so it needs to be capped with a wirenut, do not connect it to ground. As said this is not a kosher setup because the tablesaw and dust collector instructions most likely specify to run them on a 20A protected circuit. The little bump in the box with a screw hole is where the ground needs to be bonded to the box. Also the white neutral is for providing 120V that's why it's not needed in your setup. Oh... and normal voltage today in the US is 120V/240V, not 110V/220V.
 
  #5  
Old 04-13-18, 06:45 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Is this an attached garage?
 
  #6  
Old 04-13-18, 07:34 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,996
Received 39 Votes on 34 Posts
There is no overcurrent protection for the smaller receptacles. That is not compliant.
 
  #7  
Old 04-13-18, 09:48 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The electrician pulled 6 awg thwn. He put a 50amp GFI breaker in the main box. If i install a subpanel then do i replace the main breaker with just a normal 60 amp breaker? i could then reuse the 50 amp in subpanel. thanks in advance
 

Last edited by mrjpsmith; 04-13-18 at 10:06 AM. Reason: more to say
  #8  
Old 04-13-18, 09:57 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes it is an attached garage.
 
  #9  
Old 04-13-18, 10:00 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am going to look into the sub panel approach so i can protect the smaller circuits.
 
  #10  
Old 04-13-18, 10:05 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
you know every time i respond with 120 v\ 240 v i get corrected and vise versa.
 
  #11  
Old 04-13-18, 01:21 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,944
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
What you did could be OK if you're able to add 20A fuses or breakers ahead of the 20A receptacles. You can get various kinds of push button breakers or inline fuse holders that could work. Also make sure the metal boxes are connected to the ground wire. As others said a subpanel would also be a good option.
 
  #12  
Old 04-13-18, 04:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,306
Received 36 Votes on 34 Posts
The electrician pulled 6 awg thwn. He put a 50amp GFI breaker in the main box. If i install a subpanel then do i replace the main breaker with just a normal 60 amp breaker? i could then reuse the 50 amp in subpanel. thanks in advance
If the electrician pulled 6 AWG THWN, then it is rated for 65A. So, you can put 60A breaker. However, you don't have to replace existing 50A. It is just you cannot put more than 50A total load. You may choose to replace it later if the breaker start tripping from overload.
If you install a sub panel using same breakers as your main, then you can just replace existing breaker with 60A, then reuse old breaker in your sub panel.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: