14/3 into a AFCI/GFCI OUTLET

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-15-18, 12:04 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
14/3 into a AFCI/GFCI OUTLET

Curious as to know if I'm OK, or if my plan indeed stinks. I've a 14/3 split between two 15A breakers. The red wire is staying in the basement for a few lights only. I want to use a dual FCI I have on-hand and thought it would be best to put it right outside the panel to cover everything downstream (upstairs hallway and some lights.) However, it dawned on me that this 14/3 obviously shares a neutral. If the FCI outlet trips, the other breaker (red wire) will still be hot for the basement lights. Won't the outlet trip prevent the shared neutral from returning energy back to the panel? Would this cause the breaker for the red wire to trip in the case the FCI does?

Hope I worded that correctly ...

Thanks!

Chris
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-15-18, 12:52 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: United States, Virginia
Posts: 1,256
Received 33 Votes on 27 Posts
A multiwire circuit is to be on double pole breaker or to singles with a handle tie. As long as the neutral is not shared beyond the afci/GFCI outlet there should be no problem.
 
  #3  
Old 04-15-18, 12:54 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 54,598
Received 514 Votes on 484 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

You need to use a two pole 15A breaker in the panel so that both circuits are turned off together. You can use the black wire to feed the FCI but the neutral for the two circuits needs to be combined before the FCI. The neutral for the red circuit must come before the FCI and the neutral for the FCI devices must come from the FCI.
 
  #4  
Old 04-16-18, 02:58 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 3,758
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
Continue the red circuit to the basement lights using 14-2 cable connected directly to the 14-3 cable red and white.. Continue the black circuit to the upstairs using 14-2 cable connected to the load terminals of the ground fault circuit interrupter receptacle unit.

It is okay for the GFCI unit to trip killing the upstairs lights but leaving the basement lights on. If you have an overload on either the red circuit or the black circuit, the panel breaker(s) should trip killing both sets of lights. The last disadvantage can be eliminated by using two 14-2 cables instead of one 14-3 cable for the very start of the run out of the panel.
 
  #5  
Old 04-17-18, 08:34 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,290
Received 43 Votes on 35 Posts
If you have an overload on either the red circuit or the black circuit, the panel breaker(s) should trip killing both sets of lights. The last disadvantage can be eliminated by using two 14-2 cables instead of one 14-3 cable for the very start of the run out of the panel.

The disadvantage of both circuits tripping when there is a problem on only one circuit can be overcome by using two separate single pole breakers with an approved handle tie, the preferred method of protecting a multiwire branch circuit. The NEC requires common disconnect of both circuits, but common trip of both circuits is not a requirement.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: