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Replace a GFCI outlet w/non-GFCI with other GFCI's still on circuit?

Replace a GFCI outlet w/non-GFCI with other GFCI's still on circuit?

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Old 04-23-18, 04:32 PM
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Replace a GFCI outlet w/non-GFCI with other GFCI's still on circuit?

I have a 20A circuit dedicated to a row of kitchen counter outlets. There are four outlets total and all are GFCI type. I would like to convert one of the outlets to a USB/AC combo type (two 20A outlets & two 4.8A total usb ports) without built-in GFCI protection.

What would this mean for GFCI protection in general on the circuit and/or for the remaining three GFCI outlets?
 

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Old 04-23-18, 05:08 PM
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All the countertop receptacles need gfi protection . If each is wired as point of use you would need to do some rewiring to assure the protection remains in place.

 
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Old 04-23-18, 05:13 PM
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Three outlets are actually on the wall behind the counter- the fourth (which I want to have the USB ports in) is in the hallway outside the kitchen- it just happens to be on the same circuit...

Without any rewiring are you saying I would loose protection at the point of use of each remaining GFCI outlet? Or only at the point of use of the one I am changing out?

Thanks for the reply!!
 
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Old 04-23-18, 05:27 PM
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If each outlet box had a ground fault circuit interrupter receptacle unit then the wiring should have been such that if you removed one of the GFCI receptacle units the remaining boxes will still have GFCI protection.
 
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Old 04-23-18, 05:31 PM
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You only need one GFCI at the point daisy chain begins, then you can put rest of the circuit on the load side of GFCI outlet.

Check out following link.
https://www.do-it-yourself-help.com/..._diagrams.html

You will have to replace any GFCI outlets down the stream with a regular outlet. Installing another GFCI on top of a GFCI usually works fine, but may cause a false trips.
 
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Old 04-23-18, 07:07 PM
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It looks like I have just three wires attached to the terminals in each existing GFCI (2x line & ground). I'm not sure which end of the chain the outlet I'm changing is on, but either way it sound like if I just swap it without changing the wiring it will become un protected while the remaining GCIs should remain protected. I'll try and figure out if the one I'm swapping is downstream and if so I'll re-wire the closest upstream GFCI to output from the load side instead of the twist connectors.

Sound about right?

Thanks all!
 
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Old 04-23-18, 08:03 PM
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Did you check if wires are wire nutted instead of using the GFCI's terminal for a splice?

It is highly unlikely each outlets only have 1 cable entering when they are on the same circuit. If that was the case, then there will be a large junction box somewhere all the wires come together.
 
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Old 04-30-18, 02:01 PM
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All of the GFCIs were using their terminals for the splice. It ended up being the furthest upstream GFCI that I wanted to convert to a non-GFCI, which I did. All the remaining GFCIs on the circuit are still working correctly, just the changed outlet is no longer protected..

Thanks for all the help
 
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Old 04-30-18, 02:50 PM
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Now you have a code violation . You should return the gfi protection and install the USB receptacle somewhere else.
 
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Old 04-30-18, 03:24 PM
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Is it still a code problem if the outlet is in a hallway outside the kitchen? We wanted AC in a wall nook in the hallway leading to the kitchen- it just happened that receptacle went on the same circuit as the counter top receptacles in the kitchen.

Thanks for the info!
 
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Old 04-30-18, 03:58 PM
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Is it still a code problem if the outlet is in a hallway outside the kitchen?
A gray area but it is a code violation to have the receptacle on the same breaker as the kitchen receptacles unless this is a dining area.
 
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Old 04-30-18, 04:03 PM
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So if the outlet is on a wall in a dining area of the kitchen, but on the same circuit as the counter top outlets- does that become passable? I do have an outlet on the other side of the kitchen that is in the eating area and shares the counter top outlet circuit on the other side- maybe I can do it there.
 
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Old 04-30-18, 07:31 PM
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So if the outlet is on a wall in a dining area of the kitchen, but on the same circuit as the counter top outlets- does that become passable?
Yes.
Usually you have 2 20A circuits in the kitchen and 1 serves counter top and the other serves dining area. If it is a big kitchen, then 1 circuit may serve half of the counter top and the other covers the other half and dining. The idea here is split the load among 2 circuits.
 
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Old 04-30-18, 08:07 PM
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The NEC requires both of the 20 amp circuits to serve the countertop receptacles .
 
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