Should I replace outside outlet with a GFCI?

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Old 05-09-18, 03:35 PM
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Should I replace outside outlet with a GFCI?

I have an outlet on the side of my house with just an outlet (bottom receptacle is cracked also) covered with those metal flap type doors on each outlet hole on this 1971 built house.

Is it a good idea to upgrade this to a covered GFCI unit?
 
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Old 05-09-18, 04:10 PM
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Yes, replace with a gfi marked WR for weather resistant and add a bubble cover.
 
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Old 05-09-18, 06:18 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
Yes, replace with a gfi marked WR for weather resistant and add a bubble cover.
Hmmm. I just bought one of those "Preferred" ones at HD before reading you reply that was a 15 amp for around $14. I didn't see anything about WR on it. Do I have to go out an change it?

I did buy a weather seal clear box for it though.
 
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Old 05-09-18, 06:29 PM
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If you have weatherproof cover, I'd say WR is not necessary. But, it still is better to have one just in case.

If you have a GFCI receptacle in bathroom, check if tripping that GFCI (by pressing test button) cuts power to the outside receptacle. It was a common practice to tie exterior receptacles to a GFCI protected bathroom receptacle circuit before bathrooms required dedicated circuit.
 
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Old 05-09-18, 06:41 PM
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The WR is a code requirement .
 
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Old 05-09-18, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
The WR is a code requirement .
Ok, I just am trying to find it on the box on the GFCI I bought. I'm guessing the WR ones are around $20? They had a few different ones to choose from. I might have to return this one tomorrow.
 
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Old 05-09-18, 07:23 PM
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Look on the box or the face of the device for the WR.
 
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Old 05-09-18, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
Look on the box or the face of the device for the WR.
Thanks. I got the wrong one. Then the other one that I installed last year on my deck I'm guessing is also not WR, but I'll check tomorrow. You live and learn !
 
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Old 05-09-18, 08:23 PM
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Then the other one that I installed last year on my deck I'm guessing is also not WR
If one feeds the other only one needs to be GFCI if power to the second receptacle comes from the load side of the first.
 
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Old 05-09-18, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian1900 View Post
I have an outlet on the side of my house with just an outlet (bottom receptacle is cracked also) covered with those metal flap type doors on each outlet hole on this 1971 built house.

Is it a good idea to upgrade this to a covered GFCI unit?
Could the outlet be already GFCI protected by a GFCI elsewhere (in garage or panel)?
 
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Old 05-09-18, 11:55 PM
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Originally Posted by GroundCurrent View Post
Could the outlet be already GFCI protected by a GFCI elsewhere (in garage or panel)?
No, not the only other GFCI I have in the basement (where the circuit comes from) is on its own circuit to a freezer. This house is from 1971, before a lot of newer NEC codes.
 
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Old 05-10-18, 02:27 PM
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Ok here's what I found.

My 20 amp circuit labeled KITCHEN that goes to the left side of my counter in the kitchen is now GFCI protected (I updated it from a regular outlet a year ago) and then it continues on to 3 outlets in a 3 season room off the back patio and then also the outside receptacle that I was thinking of making GFCI.

So is the kitchen GFCI protecting these 4 outlets downstream and I don't have to worry about a GFCI outside?

Also, the house is 1971. I thought that the 20 amp circuit going to the kitchen countertop could ONLY go to the counter and not anywhere else. So it seems that my 20 amp KITCHEN circuit is serving not only the left counter outlet, but also an outlet on the floor in the kitchen and then 3 outlets in the 3 season room plus the OUTSIDE outlet.
 
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Old 05-10-18, 03:13 PM
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So is the kitchen GFCI protecting these 4 outlets downstream and I don't have to worry about a GFCI outside?
If they are fed from the load side of the first GFCI they are protected.
 
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Old 05-10-18, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
If they are fed from the load side of the first GFCI they are protected.
I believe that's how they are Ray. Can I press the reset test button to find out without taking the GFCI outlet apart?

So if that's the case, I don't need an outside GFCI you're sure?
 
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Old 05-10-18, 05:51 PM
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Yes, if they all go dead they are protected.
 
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Old 05-10-18, 07:56 PM
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If the "go dead" test mentioned above is not assuring enough, there are GFCI testers with a test button for less than $10.
 
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Old 05-11-18, 02:19 PM
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OK. I pressed TEST and the kitchen outlet (GFCI) went dead and the 4 outlets after it (3 in sun room and the one outside the sun room).

I'm thinking it may be a good idea to add a GFCI outside also as well for some reason. Am I wasting my time and or money? Would there be any benefit to adding one outside also if the one on the kitchen counter protects it already?

Also, I accidentally bought a 15 amp WR GFCI for this 20 amp circuit. Should I get the 20 amp GFCI?

Sorry, for all the questions.
 
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Old 05-11-18, 02:47 PM
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Sometimes two GFCIs on a circuit can cause problems though less likely with newer ones. Installing two does not enhance safety.

15 amp duplex receptacles are rated for 20 amps pass through. Same guts as a 20 amp just a different face. By code as long as there are two or more places to plug in a 15a can be used on a 20 amp circuit. A duplex receptacle provides two places to plug in.
 
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Old 05-11-18, 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Sometimes two GFCIs on a circuit can cause problems though less likely with newer ones. Installing two does not enhance safety.

15 amp duplex receptacles are rated for 20 amps pass through. Same guts as a 20 amp just a different face. By code as long as there are two or more places to plug in a 15a can be used on a 20 amp circuit. A duplex receptacle provides two places to plug in.
Darn, before reading your post I went ahead and bought a 20 amp WR GFCI and it's now installed in the outside outlet. Hopefully I'll be ok leaving it that way ... don't feel like taking it all apart again.

One thing is that this outside outlet is really on the 20 amp that serves the counter in the kitchen. I don't like it but it's a 1971 house and I'm not sure what the codes allowed in those days. I may want to somehow get this outlet off that kitchen circuit, but am not sure if it's worth the money and hassle of rewiring, etc. It's a very small house and a simple one with no HVAC, AC or anything really.

So I was thinking that if I did rewire and take the outside outlet off the circuit somehow at a later date that it would already be GFCI and everything.
 
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Old 05-11-18, 08:24 PM
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You can shift the feed to the outside receptacle from the load side of the receptacle feeding it to the line side. That in fact might be a good idea anyway so a problem with the outside receptacle doesn'taffect the kitche. ( M0st GFCIs take two wires per terminal or you could pigtail at the supplying receptacle.)
 
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Old 05-11-18, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
You can shift the feed to the outside receptacle from the load side of the receptacle feeding it to the line side. That in fact might be a good idea anyway so a problem with the outside receptacle doesn'taffect the kitche. ( M0st GFCIs take two wires per terminal or you could pigtail at the supplying receptacle.)
Thanks Ray, but that might break the circuit.

Here's the circuit order I think.

1. Refridge outlet (we moved it from where it used to be dedicated and are thinking of dedicating this outlet now to the fridge).

2. from fridge outlet to another wall outlet
3. then to the left counter GFCI
4. first outlet sunroom,
5. outside outlet (now GFCI as of today)
6. second and third outlets in sun room.

the outside outlet is in the middle of the circuit. Can I leave everything the way it is?
Another reason is that the weather proof box I installed has a bead of silicone around it since it's mounted to side of cedar shingle and I think I may have to buy another one if I break the gasket seal on the IN USE box.
 
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Old 05-11-18, 09:23 PM
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Its your option. If fully enclosed I doubt the sun room needs GFCI protection.
 
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Old 05-11-18, 10:37 PM
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If something plugs into the outside outlet (new GFCI) has a fault, which GFCI trips?

If the left counter GFCI trips, would that confuse the person using the outside outlet (may not be you) who tries to reset the obvious GFCI in sight.
 
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