Help Troubleshooting Dead GFI Receptacles

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  #1  
Old 05-14-18, 09:49 AM
J
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Help Troubleshooting Dead GFI Receptacles

Over the weekend, all (6) of the GFI receptacles, along with 3 non-GFIs went dead in my kitchen. So far I have done the following:

1. Checked the circuit breaker in the panel
2. Tried to reset the GFIs (none of them would reset)

Called in a friend who is more knowlegable that I am and we did the following:

1. Tested the breaker with a meter (only had 7V coming out) and replaced it.
2. Tried to reset the GFIs (none of them would reset)
3. Started pulling the receptacles from the wall to look for loose connections. Got through 2 of the 3 non-GFIs and 3 of the GFIs, so far all look good.
4. Started tracing the run from the panel to see where it entered the first receptacle looking for any type of damage.

We cannot see any visual junction boxes as the basement below the kitchen is open (single floor, raised ranch dwelling), nor can we determine where the run enters the first receptacle. We are at a total loss.

Before I call in a licensed electrician, is there anything that we could be missing?

Thanks.
 
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Old 05-14-18, 11:06 AM
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Did you check for voltage on the line and load side of each receptacle. Having a mix of GFCI and non GFCI may be causing confusion if any of the GFCIs are fed from the load side of another GFCI.

Also have you read: https://www.doityourself.com/forum/e...ther-info.html
 
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Old 05-14-18, 11:08 AM
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Ray,

Only got to 3 of the 6 GFIs. Going to continue tonight.

Yes, I read that before posting the question. Thanks for your response.
 
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Old 05-14-18, 11:10 AM
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See addition to my post. .
 
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Old 05-14-18, 11:13 AM
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Thanks, Ray. Yes, they are all connected together. Not sure what my kitchen remodeler did 12 years ago seeing as they are all on the same circuit.
 
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Old 05-14-18, 12:13 PM
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There should only be one GFCI, the first one. You may have a bad GFCI that needs replacing but your arrangement makes it difficult to troubleshoot.
 
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Old 05-21-18, 08:59 AM
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UPDATE:

My issue has been resolved.

It seems that the @sshole that remodelled my kitchen BURIED an old receptacle box behind my pantry (he removed the receptacle and made it an ILLEGAL junction box). We were able to access it via the other side of the wall, which went down to the basement. One of the connections became loose, thus making everything "downstream" dead.

We removed the box, replaced it with a new one, reconnected the wiring, and had it face the basement steps with an accessable cover in case of future problems.

Thank you, Ray2047, for all of your suggestions & help.

Why do people do things half-@ssed and illegal? I guess I'll never know. . .
 
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Old 05-21-18, 09:09 AM
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Why do people do things half-@ssed and illegal?
So we won't run out of questions to answer.

Great job of detective work, kudos.

If I may make a suggestion, remove all but the first GFCI and make sure the first non GFCI receptacle is fed from the load side of that GFCI. Only one GFCI will make any future troubleshooting a bit easier.
 
 

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