Hardwiring oven

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  #1  
Old 05-17-18, 10:38 PM
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Hardwiring oven

Hi-

We have a 220volt? outlet in our garage. The paperwork says (50-60 AMP DEDICATED CIRCUIT). I have attached a picture of the outlet.

I would like to put a small commercial grade convection oven in our garage and use this outlet.

https://www.restaurantsupply.com/duk...r-finish-10-kw

However, the manual says that it needs to be hardwired.

1) Is hardwiring something I can do easily? I have done lots of small wiring projects around our house but nothing of this voltage. This outlet is 2feet from our main electrical panel to the entire house.

2) Is it possible to just wiring a heavy-duty oven/washer plug to the oven wiring and then just plug it in? I don't understand why it has to be hardwired.

Thanks!

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Last edited by PJmax; 05-19-19 at 12:30 AM. Reason: resized picture
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Old 05-17-18, 11:04 PM
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Does the breaker match the required breaker for your oven? If so just remove the receptacle and after wiring install a blank cover plate. Using the proper connector install the whip to one of the box knockouts.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 08:48 AM
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Here is a picture of the breaker. Its 1 and 3 in the upper left.
I really know very little about this stuff. Thank you.

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Last edited by PJmax; 05-19-19 at 12:32 AM. Reason: resized picture
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Old 05-18-18, 01:51 PM
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I have a 240 volt outlet correct? I hear people say 220v sometimes and that confuses me. Thanks.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 02:05 PM
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220 is old nomenclature . The correct voltage is 240.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 02:16 PM
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awesome thank you. im just typing more because it says my message is too short to post.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 02:17 PM
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To be 100% correct you have a 50 amp, 120/240V receptacle. Specific type NEMA 14-50. It provides both 120V and 240V at up to 50 amps.

110V and 220V were the standard 100 years ago but you still hear it sometimes. Nominal residential voltages are now 120V and 240V, but they will vary up to 10% depending on specific local conditions.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 02:20 PM
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Ok here is the big question here: I want to purchase this oven but I don't know if I have enough amperage to run it. Please tell me it will work, thank you.

AMPs. 45.8-52.8 (1-phase)

https://www.restaurantsupply.com/duk...iAAEgJkHvD_BwE
 
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Old 05-18-18, 02:44 PM
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You may need to change the breaker to 60 amps assuming wire is #6 if it repeatedly trips the breaker.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 03:03 PM
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Thanks. The inspector is coming out next week so I am hoping I will get a look inside the outlet when he does.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 03:04 PM
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50-60A is a little ambiguous. Is there a wattage listed for the oven ?

You can turn the 2P50A breaker off and then open the receptacle to look.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 03:08 PM
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So the oven spec says 10,000 watts and 45.8 - 52.8 amps. I see know that the paperwork from the electrician is ambiguous in that is says 50-60 amp.

I see that homedepot etc has 60amp breakers. Is it easy to swap out the 50 amp breakers I have?
 
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Old 05-18-18, 03:13 PM
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10k @ 240v is 42A. So there may be several amps required for the controls.
A wire size confirmation is needed before a breaker increase can be done.
 
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Old 05-18-18, 03:15 PM
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Ok, I will report back after the inspector comes out next week. Thank you
 
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Old 05-21-18, 11:18 AM
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Inspector said I can swap in a 60amp breaker no problem. Thankfully, he said they used quality components. Any reason why they didn't just put a 60amp breaker in the box instead? Cost? thanks.
 
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Old 05-21-18, 12:29 PM
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They used a 50 amp receptacle so they were limited to a 50 amp breaker.
 
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Old 05-21-18, 12:31 PM
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what is the receptacle? I thought you just pull the double break in slot 1-3 out and slap a new one in. thx
 
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Old 05-21-18, 12:55 PM
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The receptacle is where the old unit was plugged into.

the wiring needs to be sized for the breaker. You cannot up size a breaker if the wiring is not large enough . You would create a fire hazard . Wiring that is too small would overheat before the breaker tripped.
 
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Old 05-23-18, 10:25 AM
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10k @ 240v is 42A. So there may be several amps required for the controls.

It's a convection oven meaning there is fan motor amperage to be considered as well.
 
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Old 05-23-18, 07:31 PM
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*Edit: I added a zip file with the oven's specs. It was too small to read when inlined in the post. TY

Ok. I would love to order one of these suckers soon. Electricity is confusing to me = ).

I have attached a few pictures from the manual regarding electrical requirements. Can someone please help

me verify that I want the 240V single phase option? It looks like I should be good with my 240v 50amp receptacle correct?

thanks everyone
 

Last edited by PJmax; 05-19-19 at 12:28 AM. Reason: removed zip file
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Old 05-23-18, 08:00 PM
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Single phase 120/240 is common in the US for a residential service .
 
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Old 05-23-18, 10:32 PM
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cool, thank you for the help
 
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