12 ampere, what wattage?

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Old 06-23-18, 07:28 AM
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12 ampere, what wattage?

Hello:
We, the family plans to purchase a powerful, either 12 Amp Motor or 15 Amp Motor Reciprocating saw for outdoor project.

My house was equipped Circuit Breaker, not like newly Breaker for new houses.

My questions is;
What wattages 12 Amp and 15 Amp? Because, in the past when we used the 1100 Watt-Microwave, fuse blew up.

Thanks for your help in advance.
 
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Old 06-23-18, 07:38 AM
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Simple explanation. Wattage is what you're going to pay the power company. Amperage is what current you're drawing. Your circuit breakers are there to protect the wiring. If your circuit is rated for 15 amps and the appliance is drawing 15 amps or less you're safe. That's assuming that appliance is the only item running off that circuit. If you're using and out door appliance or tool such as the saw you ideally want a dedicated 20 amp circuit. Length and gauge of extension cord is important also. The longer the extension the heaver the gauge wire should be to handle the amperage draw.

Our electrical experts will give you a more detailed explanation.
 
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Old 06-23-18, 07:44 AM
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W=VxA

Wattage is volts multiplied by amps

120 volts x 12 amps equals 1440 watts.

120 volts x 15 amps equals 1800 watts

in the past when we used the 1100 Watt-Microwave, fuse blew up.
Were there other electrical loads on the same circuit as the microwave?

What was the amperage rating of the fuse?
 
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Old 06-23-18, 07:53 AM
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When your microwave popped the circuit what was the circuit rating it was on? And what other items were being used on that same circuit at the same time. As wirepuller has shown, wattage will rise or fall based on the amperage draw. It does not determine the safety of the circuit. Wattage is a power usage term and you pay according to the amount you use. Think of it in terms of a light bulb. They all use the same socket with the same voltage using a 15 amp breaker. But your wattage will vary depending on what amperage they draw. A brighter bulb draws more amperage and you pay more for the brighter light.
 
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Old 06-23-18, 07:53 AM
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Thanks both for the quick responses.

It means that 12 amps draw 1440 watts. It's quite wattages. It's no way for us, the family purchase 18 amp saw.
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120 volts x 12 amps equals 1440 watts.
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Old 06-23-18, 07:57 AM
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If that saw in fact draws 18 amps at full load, you should be using a 20 amp circuit with GFIC rated for outdoor use.
 
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Old 06-23-18, 08:17 AM
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Thanks,
We plan to stick with a 12 AMP saw for the safety-reason. Also, it's 15 amp circuit and not for outdoor-use circuit. Also, when we used other saw with 10 amp., the circuit never blew-up. It appears to me that 12 amp saw is max for us, the family, because the house is not newly built one.
 
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Old 06-23-18, 09:43 AM
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Ignorance is Bliss.

PineCone is reducing a complex issue into simplistic terms. Saying for
safety-reason
and
house is not newly build
is nonsense.

Those 12 amp items can draw 3 to 4 times as much when starting ..36 to 48 amps. Because electrical items can degrade it is best not to load near max.

For residential wiring 20 amp, #12 wire circuits are used were loads are high.. i.e. kitchen, bathroom and shop outlets. Most of the items used on them draw less than 15 amps. Over time those outlets can degrade and show signs of over heating. When an electrical plug starts getting warm or hot that is a warning sign.

PineCone should look at the data on USA residential fires resulting from electrical issues.
 
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