electrical outlets in MA

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Old 07-07-18, 08:50 AM
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electrical outlets in MA

Hello all,

Is there a good description of what standards you need to follow to install compliant outlets in MA in a residential house?

It is a bit confusing. For example, rumor has it that there is a federal regulation requiring you to only use tamper-resistant outlets:

https://www.familyhandyman.com/elect...make/view-all/

However, even the local Home Depot carries non-temper resistant (and much cheaper) outlets. So I would definitely appreciate any help on what the relevant regulations actually are.

Cheers,

Boris.
 
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Old 07-07-18, 12:19 PM
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The NEC requires tamper proof receptacles. Whether the NEC has been adopted or not is up to the local building officials.

Depending on your area you may need to hire a licensed contractor for the wiring.
 
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Old 07-07-18, 12:57 PM
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Also, you may also be required to upgrade the circuit to AFCI protection if you replace the receptacle(s). Again, this will depend on your local requirements.

According to here: https://www.mass.gov/service-details...lectrical-code you are on the 2017 NEC
 
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Old 07-07-18, 02:30 PM
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rumor has it that there is a federal regulation requiring you to only use tamper-resistant outlets:

That's what is is, just a rumor. There are no Federal regulations concerning electrical standards that must be met. All regulation and code adoption, amendments, additions and deletions is done at the local or state level, the Feds are not involved.
 
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Old 07-07-18, 02:42 PM
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Check with your county inspector on Monday, you should be able to get the # off of your county's website. Good luck, most of those outlets are junk or at the very least a PITA. In addition, AFCI breakers tend to not last very long either, at least in my experience. We live in a very rural area and line surges make the breakers fail quite often, as in they either fail completely, or get so sensitive after a while they pop whenever the wind picks up.
 
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Old 07-07-18, 02:54 PM
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We live in a very rural area and line surges make the breakers fail quite often, as in they either fail completely, or get so sensitive after a while they pop whenever the wind picks up.

That's a problem I have never seen or heard of with the combination AFCI breakers. Sounds like in your area you need to have a Whole House Surge Suppressor at every house.
 
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Old 07-07-18, 03:54 PM
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CasualJoe, yep, a surge suppressor is in the plans atm, very common problem in the area. Unfortunately, the two things I never work on are HVAC and panel issues, and local quotes for the WHSS are upwards of $1k. As it is now, we have had to install the best plug-in type suppressors on all our electronics until we can get that done, as I simply do not trust the system as it is, and even losing our TV would cost us $3k to replace, let alone the damage to computers.
 
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Old 07-07-18, 06:17 PM
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There is whole house suppression that will fit in a panel for way less than your quote.
 
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Old 07-08-18, 09:46 AM
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Here is a Whole House Surge Suppressor you can install at your main panel yourself for less than $100.


https://www.lowes.com/pd/Eaton-1890-...tor/1000060733


You can continue to use your suppressor strips for supplemental protection as long as the branch circuits they are plugged into have a grounding conductor. No grounding conductor = no protection.
 
 

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