Looking for info on putting power to a shed.

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Old 07-25-18, 07:25 AM
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Looking for info on putting power to a shed.

I need to run electrical to my shed. Rather than running individual wiring for each thing, I wondered if itís possible to run a separate small breaker box in the shed. Our cottage has a main breaker panel of 100 amp. In the shed I will have a refrigerator, lights, some outlets, and an electric dryer. Can someone give me info on what size breaker I would need in the panel and what size wiring to run to the shed to supply a small breaker box?
 
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Old 07-25-18, 07:37 AM
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If you plan to have an electric dryer I recommend at least a 60A breaker panel for the shed. That would require wiring of #6 copper or #4 aluminum, but larger might be required if the distance is more than about 100 feet. The shed subpanel needs a four wire feeder, separate ground and neutral bus bars and a ground rod bonded to the ground bus with #6 copper.
 
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Old 07-25-18, 07:51 AM
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Thank you for that info. So if I understand correctly I am running 6/3 wire with ground from the main panel to the shed, which is less than 100 feet away, and connecting it to a 60 amp box. The circuit breaker in the main panel would be a double pole 60 amp? I also did not realize I would need to put in a separate grounding rod.
 
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Old 07-25-18, 08:16 AM
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Yes 6/3g UF-B can be direct buried (not regular romex NM-B!) at 24" deep to the shed. Use a conduit sleeve for protection of the cable from the building down to the bottom of the trench. In the shed you need a box that is at least 60A but can be bigger. You don't need a main breaker in the shed if there are 6 or fewer circuits. A single circuit to an outbuilding would not require a ground rod, but a panel does.
 
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Old 07-25-18, 10:39 AM
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Thank you so much!!! I know you said 60 amp minimum or larger in the shed. I assume that whatever amp box I get must be the size of the breaker that I put in the main panel to run the power out there. Is that correct?
 
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Old 07-25-18, 11:31 AM
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You can use a 100A main breaker panel in the shed if you like even though it's fed by a 60A breaker at the house. Those are more common and sometimes the cheapest way to go.
 
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Old 07-25-18, 01:57 PM
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And a main breaker panel kit comes with an assortment of branch circuit breakers making it a good bargain. The main breaker in the subpanel is used only as a disconnect so using a 100a panel is no problem.
 
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Old 07-25-18, 06:35 PM
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As always, you guys are amazing! I find so much advice on this site and I truly truly appreciate it. Thank you all for everything you do!
 
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