Testing a bunch of aaa batteries (most around 1.18-1.21)

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Old 07-31-18, 06:14 PM
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Testing a bunch of aaa batteries (most around 1.18-1.21)

Should I toss those in that range?
 
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Old 07-31-18, 07:11 PM
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Did you test under load? .
 
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Old 07-31-18, 07:41 PM
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No idea how to do that. Just held the black to the - and red to +.
 
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Old 07-31-18, 08:19 PM
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You need to use a battery checker that puts a load on it. Voltage will drip under load. How much it drops determines if it is good. To do that you use a battery tester or multimeter with a battery test function. Example: https://www.walmart.com/ip/New-Universal-Battery-Tester-Load-Checker-AA-AAA-9V-C-D-Power-Portable-Load-New/50566860?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=709&adid=22222222227038170306&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=85318320650&wl4=pla-193241087570&wl5=9027667&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=112343202&wl11=online&wl12=50566860&wl13=&veh=sem

I doubt any of the batteries are good given how low the no load values are.
 
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Old 07-31-18, 08:27 PM
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Thanks for finding that tester on Walmart.com (which I just bought)...good price also + free shipping!
 
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Old 07-31-18, 09:17 PM
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1.2V is a fully charged voltage for a rechargeable battery, but not for an alkaline battery.
At that voltage without load the batteries are probably 1/3 to 1/2 drained. It will still work on low current devices, but definitely not a fresh battery. You will get 1.5V or slightly higher voltage with a fresh battery. Even when you see correct voltage, that doesn't mean it is good unless you put it on load. That is where battery tester is useful.
 
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Old 07-31-18, 09:29 PM
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Originally Posted by lambition View Post
1.2V is a fully charged voltage for a rechargeable battery, but not for an alkaline battery.
At that voltage without load the batteries are probably 1/3 to 1/2 drained. It will still work on low current devices, but definitely not a fresh battery. You will get 1.5V or slightly higher voltage with a fresh battery. Even when you see correct voltage, that doesn't mean it is good unless you put it on load. That is where battery tester is useful.
That's good to know, thank you.
 
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Old 08-01-18, 11:20 AM
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I've got one of those cheaper testers...and I don't think it's worth the plastic it's made of. Gardner brand, so not a junk name, but it constantly tells me a battery is plenty good for use (needle just barely below a fresh cell) and yet it won't work in a device. Check with a meter and it's 1.28V or 1.37V or some such.

The little strips that glow yellow or green that come with some batteries are a better test than the testers with a needle...IMO of course. At least they are free.

I toss any alkaline batteries below 1.45 or so...they just aren't going to last.
 
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Old 08-01-18, 03:30 PM
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My biggest objection to batteries is when they leak a $2 battery can destroy a several hundred dollar machine. Even if it were just a flashlight, what leaks can get all over other things. When in doubt, throw it out. (not the equipment just the questionable battery).

Bud
 
 

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