Water inside Copper Wire for 100 Amp Subpanel

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Old 08-05-18, 04:12 PM
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Question Water inside Copper Wire for 100 Amp Subpanel

Hello,

Recently started a project to add a 100 amp sub-panel in the basement of my house (main panel is in the garage) for a work shop. I bought the appropriate sized wire to run power to the panel from my local hardware store. I noticed after running the wire to the basement that there is water dripping out of the wire, from INSIDE the insulation. The wires are all bone dry on the outside, but a small amount of water is dripping out of the inside.
The wire is stored on a large spool at the hardware store outside in a yard, so my assumption is the water got in the cut end of the wire there.

My question is this: Is this small amount of water inside the insulation on the copper wire a concern? I don't know if it will evaporate through the thick plastic shielding or not. Could it cause a problem in the sub-panel? Or cause overheating in the wire as current runs through the wire?

Any help is much appreciated!
Thanks,
Rock
 
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Old 08-05-18, 05:20 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

I'd doubt that would be anything to worry about. That water will dry up on it's own.
 
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Old 08-05-18, 06:05 PM
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Will the water evaporate through the thick Plastic insulation though? I assumed the insulation would be water proof, which would make it difficult for the water to go anywhere.
 
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Old 08-05-18, 06:21 PM
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It will evaporate out the same way it got in...through the cut ends. It probably isn't that much in the first place.

Is this wire (one conductor even if it has many strands) or is it cable (multiple insulated conductors inside an outer sheath)?

It won't cause overheating...in fact it would do just the opposite until it all evaporates...it would cool the conductors to some small extent.
 
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Old 08-05-18, 07:55 PM
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It is 4 separate wires. Three of them are 3 gauge and one is 4 gauge.
 
 

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