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KVAR vs HEPD device what are differences and similarities.

KVAR vs HEPD device what are differences and similarities.

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  #1  
Old 08-07-18, 02:50 PM
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KVAR vs HEPD device what are differences and similarities.

Will a KVAR provide surge supression like an HEPD?
I assume an HEPD will not provide power factor correction.
If these devices are installed wthin the same panel will they act synergistically or will they conflict with each other?
If I have subpanels would I need HEPD on each panel (assuming not).
Anyone want to take this on and give a "dissertation".
Offer pro's and con's?

My thoughts are better to have and not need then need and not have.

Thanks in advance and best regards.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-09-18, 10:22 AM
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A power factor correction system (measured in units of kVAR) is completely different from a surge protector (HEPD). They work in different ways and more or less have nothing to do with each other.

In residential usage power factor correction essentially has no meaningful effect and can make power quality worse if not specifically designed for the loads it's correcting.

Surge protection works best in a tiered layout. A panel or meter mounted surge device is a good idea, and so are point-of-use surge protectors at electronics. In either case, a good earth grounding system is required at the electrical service entrance of the building for any surge protector to be effective. If your subpanels are in outbuildings, panel mounted surge protectors would be a good idea. Subpanels in the same building do not need separate surge protection.
 
  #3  
Old 08-09-18, 10:58 AM
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Got it. I do have two KVARs that I got for free, new so I mounted them on dedicated breakers at the main panel and a subpanel. The only use I see would be for air our window mounted air conditioners and freezer (Non energy star types) but would they be most effective mounted close to the device versus on the panel? Also is there any protection from surges, spikes and lightning afforded? Since they were free would you recommend that I leave them installed or would you recommend removing them? I appreciate the advice.
 
  #4  
Old 08-10-18, 10:50 AM
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The power factor correction devices would have no effect on surges, spikes or lightning. They only realign the current and voltage waveforms that get out of sync in motor windings. The problem is that if those devices aren't designed or tuned specifically for the site they will over- or under-correct which is just as bad as the original problem. Virtually all appliance motors have some level of PFC built-in so adding more doesn't help.

I would remove them and sell on eBay as they really offer no benefit on a residential service. PFCs do reduce the consumption of reactive power when they are designed correctly; however residential customers are not billed for reactive power in the US. The rate you pay is based on average consumption across typical residential loads like fridges and ACs so it's already figured in no matter what your actual consumption is.

Commercial sites do get billed directly for reactive power consumption so it makes sense and is often required by power company policy they do power factor correction for their large motor loads.
 
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