Garbage Disposal - Dedicated circuit necessary?

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Old 08-22-18, 11:36 AM
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Garbage Disposal - Dedicated circuit necessary?

Hello, I'm new to this forum and this is my first post.

A new first-time home owner and already getting started on projects. First things first, got to make wifey happy by installing a garbage disposal so we are looking to install a receptacle under the kitchen sink. Our electrician said it is not mandatory to run a dedicated circuit for it because its common to share a circuit with a dishwasher but our dishwasher is currently hard-wired to our circuit breaker box. Our kitchen currently has 6 counter-top receptacles, divided evenly across 2 20-amp breakers, so 3 receptacles on each breaker. He is recommending to tap into the closest receptacle (currently containing two outlets) to get the power for the new one that would go under the sink and then replace that receptacle with a 2-in-1 switch and outlet combo receptacle. I hope I'm making sense here.

My question now is - is this a smart or bad way to do this?

I'm going to Home Depot today to just browse around and see what the typical amp requirement is for garbage disposals, for say 3/4 hp models. Creating a worse case scenario here, I want to add that to the two largest counter-top appliances that may possibly be used simultaneously with the disposal to see if i'll exceed 80% usage of that 20-amp breaker.

Is this a good way to tackle this project? Any advice is much appreciated!!

EDIT: Just an FYI - I'm a NJ resident.

EDIT 2: For a true worse case scenario, I guess I'd have to add 5 of the biggest plug-in appliances actually, assuming one is hooked up to every single outlet associated with that one 20-amp breaker.
 
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Old 08-22-18, 12:07 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

You can share the dishwasher circuit but by code.... you cannot use one of the countertop circuits to power the disposer.
 
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Old 08-22-18, 12:15 PM
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Thanks for your reply!

Is this per NEC and is this across all states or specifically for NJ? I want to do things right so I don't run into issues down the line if we ever decide to sell. No point in paying someone to do it wrong, then pay them (or someone else) to fix it later on. Might as well pay accordingly to do it right the first time.

Is there a way to get a copy of the codes? I haven't had any luck getting my hands on them via the web.
 
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Old 08-22-18, 12:30 PM
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Hi, your electrician should know your local codes, is it possible to run a new circuit back to the panel? also it may be possibly to pull the DW feed back into the sink cabinet and refeed both from there, an air switch is also an option so as a new wall switch would not need to be fished above the counter. https://www.amazon.com/Disposal-Insi.../dp/B0728BB4ZM.
Geo
 
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Old 08-22-18, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Geochurchi View Post
Hi, your electrician should know your local codes, is it possible to run a new circuit back to the panel? also it may be possibly to pull the DW feed back into the sink cabinet and refeed both from there, an air switch is also an option so as a new wall switch would not need to be fished above the counter. https://www.amazon.com/Disposal-Insi.../dp/B0728BB4ZM.
Geo
Not sure to be honest - I'm sure it's possible considering it's done for the dishwasher which is right next to it. I think the electrician came up with this method because we really preferred getting a wall switch to control the disposal but the wall has a backsplash and the odds of knocking down the tiles and running into a stud is high because we have a window unit right in front of the sink so there is definitely support beams in that region.

My wife and I thought about an air switch as well but how would drilling in the granite counter-top work? We assumed this method might require more labor and expenses so we didn't really explore that option. We were just going to get the toggle switch installed under the sink (which was a bit annoying but we were compromising) but then we came up with this idea.
 
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Old 08-22-18, 01:43 PM
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To get the answer that really matters, call your local building inspector's office.
 
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Old 08-22-18, 06:05 PM
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You can also buy a Batch feed disposal that has the switch in the throat of the unit, the stopper must be installed in order for the disposal to operate, certainly better than a switch under the counter.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/InSinkEr...PLUS/204324517
Geo
 
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Old 08-22-18, 06:53 PM
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It might be possible to.take the cable.from the dishwasher into a junction box.and add a receptacle. You would add.a.cord.to the dishwasher.
 
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Old 08-23-18, 11:30 AM
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Thanks for the replies, everyone - this definitely helps.

I'm trying to read up on NEC codes but I can't seem to really find anything that clearly says that a dedicated circuit breaker is necessary. I also don't quite understand how it can share a receptacle with a dishwasher, a heavy-load appliance, but it can't share it with 3 counter-top receptacles for low-loading appliances.

Unfortunately I can't really ask my electrician much because he doesn't speak good English (any for that matter) but he was recommended by 2 friends who had their house remodeled and they were extremely pleased with his work and he's extremely affordable. Yes I know, his affordability may be costing me time to do my own research and confirm the work being proposed is correct, but he's legitimately quoting me 50% less than others and I don't mind learning new things on the side.
 

Last edited by pabadear; 08-23-18 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 08-23-18, 12:52 PM
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A dedicated circuit is not needed or required.
If you can't share it with the dishwasher then a dedicated circuit would be one choice,
 
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Old 08-23-18, 03:02 PM
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The requirements would be in Article 210 or the manufacturer instructions. You will need to read into part of it since it will not be stated directly.
 
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Old 08-24-18, 08:34 AM
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Listen to Geochurchi, batch feed is the way to go - easy to operate and no granite cutting.
 
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Old 08-24-18, 11:57 AM
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I'm trying to read up on NEC codes
Unfortunately, the NEC (like other codes) aren't really 'readable'. There are exceptions to the exceptions, and sections that refer to 6 other sections depending on certain conditions. And that doesn't even start to consider portions of the code which are up for interpretation. In most cases, a good book like Wiring Simplified or similar will more clearly state the code "rules" for 99% of residential installations.

...but I can't seem to really find anything that clearly says that a dedicated circuit breaker is necessary.
Most dedicated circuit requirements come from the installation instructions for the device. An over range microwave for example requires a dedicated 20A circuit, usually due to the manufacturer's instructions, not specifically the NEC.
Most standard dishwashers (unless you get some super-powered one) does not require one - and the circuit is typically shared with the disposal. In theory, it could be shared with other appliances too.

I also don't quite understand how it can share a receptacle with a dishwasher, a heavy-load appliance, but it can't share it with 3 counter-top receptacles for low-loading appliances.
Here's where the NEC specifically calls out two 20A small appliance (countertop) circuits. These circuits can be shared with dining room and kitchen receptacles, but can not be shared with lighting, fixed appliances, or anything outside the Kitchen/DR. Just the way it is

(and has to do with older kitchens sharing one circuit and experiencing constant breaker tripping when the toaster and refrigerator are both on)
 
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Old 09-06-18, 08:39 AM
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Thanks for everyone's input! Haven't decided which route to take still but will go over things with my electrician and see his recommendations.

I do feel comfortable feeding it from the kitchen receptacles though. We have so many of them around the kitchen that we never use them, even when we have 3 people working in there during a big family feast. When I add up the heaviest amp-using appliances to the amps required for a garbage disposal, I'm still well within range and won't run the risk of tripping the fuse.

My main concern was whether or not motor-powered devices such as a garbage disposal ruins other devices connected within the same circuit. A friend of mine told me to be mindful of that because his TV, which was connected to a receptacle in the kitchen, ended up burning out within a year and it was later discovered that the same receptacle used was feeding off the refrigerator receptacle and that degraded the TV circuit board (or other components inside?) over the course of that year of usage till it gave out.
 
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Old 09-06-18, 04:34 PM
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The code really doesn't care that you feel comfortable feeding from the countertop circuits. It wants the capacity reserved for mixers, toasters etc. Not everyone will cook the same and there is no sense in creating a code violation.
 
 

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