Wiring a NEMA 14/50 for EV Charging in Garage

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Old 08-30-18, 06:47 PM
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Wiring a NEMA 14/50 for EV Charging in Garage

Hello - I am in Virginia. I am pretty handy and want to make sure I am doing this according to code. Can someone help me figure out if something is not according to code? I am using
  1. 220v 50 Amp breaker.
  2. 6/3 Stranded Romex SIMpull CU NM-B W/G Wire (Black line depicted in the pictures)
  3. NEMA 14-50 socket

In the first step you can see the wire coming out of the drywall. The panel is right behind this. Are there any codes as far as how far above it should be from the floor or if a junction box is needed where it comes out of drywall and goes to the stud (to travel up)?
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Then I am planning to run the wire along the sides. Comes out of drywall, goes up, then across top and then comes down. The basement wall is not finished. I am planning to use the staples to keep the wire in place. Are there any codes that the wire must run in conduit?
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The wire comes down, I will put a piece of plywood between the two garage doors that will hold the NEMA 14-50 outlet/socket. Any code that the socket cannot be mounted between the garage doors?
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Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 08-30-18, 07:59 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Just some terminolgy to correct:
1) You have a 240 volt service. Not 220v. (Actually it is 120/240v)
3) It is a receptacle, not a socket. Outlet would also be acceptable.

NM cable, aka Romex, needs to be protected from physical damage. Normally I figure that anyplace in a garage it can be subjected to physical damage because of the use of garden tools (Rakes, shovels) and ladders can easily damage the cable. Inside a wall stud space cables are considered protected. Therefore I would recommend drilling all the studs and run the cable through the studs. Since framers like to make it as hard as possible to run cables through walls, in your case the garage door header, you may want to sleeve the romex in some conduit for protection there. You could also cut a notch in the header and install nail plates. Down low where you enter the garage you will need to protect the cable where it is not in a stud space.
 
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Old 08-30-18, 08:31 PM
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Just some terminolgy to correct:
1) You have a 240 volt service. Not 220v. (Actually it is 120/240v)
3) It is a receptacle, not a socket. Outlet would also be acceptable.
Got it.

NM cable, aka Romex, needs to be protected from physical damage. Normally I figure that anyplace in a garage it can be subjected to physical damage because of the use of garden tools (Rakes, shovels) and ladders can easily damage the cable. Inside a wall stud space cables are considered protected. Therefore I would recommend drilling all the studs and run the cable through the studs.
That would be a lot of 3/4 inch to 1inch holes to put this thick cable and may compromise the structural integrity. The horizontal run (second picture), stapled to the outside of top stud framing will not pass inspection? I know in future one can't put a drywall easily as the wire is stapled to the outside but is is more than eight feet high so might be okay code wise or no? When drywall has to be put in (not in any near future), we can deal with it then. There is attic above this without the floor (just frame and drywall) so I am trying not to walk in the attic.

Since framers like to make it as hard as possible to run cables through walls, in your case the garage door header, you may want to sleeve the romex in some conduit for protection there. You could also cut a notch in the header and install nail plates. Down low where you enter the garage you will need to protect the cable where it is not in a stud space.
Got it, for both horizontal runs - from celling to the receptacle in between garage doors and where the cable enters from the drywall to the stud space to the celling, I can use EMT as I hear they need to be protected up to 8 feet.
 
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Old 08-30-18, 08:49 PM
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I.would run it above the ceiling. A 3/4 inch hole will not take too much out of the stud.
 
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Old 08-30-18, 09:35 PM
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I understand that drilling a hole in each vertical stud to go horizontal or through the attic is better but they both require a lot more work. Is the below not code compliant if the celling is 8'+ and the wire is fastened to the outside?
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Old 08-31-18, 07:08 AM
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Hi, Clip Clip Clip, I don’t believe there is an issue with your plan, based on cable size, what I could consider is between the garage doors make a small chase between the 2X4 s and the door rails and run the cable behind it and into the receptacle, although this is not a crawl space or unfinished attic I think this rule may apply as to physical damage.“
C) In Unfinished Basements and Crawl Spaces. Where cable is run at angles with joists in unfinished basements and crawl spaces, it shall be permissible to secure cables not smaller than two 6 AWG or three 8 AWG conductors directly to the lower edges of the joists. Smaller cables shall be run either through bored holes in joists or on running boards. Nonmetallic-sheathed cable installed on the wall of an unfinished basement shall be permitted to be installed in a listed conduit or tubing or shall be protected in accordance with 300.4. Conduit or tubing shall be provided with a suitable insulating bushing or adapter at the point the cable enters the raceway. The sheath of the nonmetallic-sheathed cable shall extend through the conduit or tubing and into the outlet or device box not less than 6 mm (╝ in.). The cable shall be secured within 300 mm (12 in.) of the point where the cable enters the conduit or tubing. Metal conduit, tubing, and metal outlet boxes shall be connected to an equipment grounding conductor complying with the provisions”

Excerpt From
NFPA 70«, National Electrical Code« (NEC«), 2014 Edition
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/nfp...12925892?mt=11
This material may be protected by copyright.
 
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Old 08-31-18, 01:46 PM
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The code is deliberately vague on the definitions around protection and subject to damage. Individual inspectors or your local inspection office will have their own interpretations. We tend to lean toward a more conservative interpretation which would require more protection for exposed cables. Many inspectors would have no qualms about the cable surface mounted on the framing; many would flag it as a violation. You can't know for sure unless you directly ask your local inspector, but if you're just rolling the dice I'd lean toward more protection so you don't have a chance of failed inspection and rework.

As for the structural integrity question, you can drill up to 40% of the center of a load bearing stud per framing code. You cannot drill through horizontal beams and headers. You can drill up to 33% of the center of a horizontal joist.

A secondary note is that the wall between the house and garage is a rated fire wall, so any hole you drill through that wall will need to be completely air sealed with red fire caulk after the cable is installed. The same rule applies if you drill or cut through the garage ceiling if there is living space above the garage.
 
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Old 08-31-18, 09:01 PM
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Thank you so much for responding.


The code is deliberately vague on the definitions around protection and subject to damage. Individual inspectors or your local inspection office will have their own interpretations. We tend to lean toward a more conservative interpretation which would require more protection for exposed cables. Many inspectors would have no qualms about the cable surface mounted on the framing; many would flag it as a violation. You can't know for sure unless you directly ask your local inspector, but if you're just rolling the dice I'd lean toward more protection so you don't have a chance of failed inspection and rework.
Got it. There are several other Romex visible through the celling in this garage so I may go the easy route first and if the inspector says something removing the stapes shouldn't be that hard to re-route the wire.

As for the structural integrity question, you can drill up to 40% of the center of a load bearing stud per framing code. You cannot drill through horizontal beams and headers. You can drill up to 33% of the center of a horizontal joist.
Thanks. I am reading that even if I route through holes in the studs, the code says you should still conceal it a.k.a drywall which I don't really want to do.

A secondary note is that the wall between the house and garage is a rated fire wall, so any hole you drill through that wall will need to be completely air sealed with red fire caulk after the cable is installed. The same rule applies if you drill or cut through the garage ceiling if there is living space above the garage.
I changed it to not drill the hole from drywall but directly on the stud. Does that hole also need to be sealed using fire caulk?
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