Under cabinet range hood electrical

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Old 09-03-18, 11:42 AM
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Under cabinet range hood electrical

Hi everyone I'm going to be installing an under cabinet range hood. the original range hood was just a spliced extension cord run to an outlet across the room but I want to do it correctly

my initial thought pattern was to install an electrical box inside the cabinet above the range hood and then run a 12/2 Romex through the back of the wood cabinet and inside the wall into the basement and finally into a GFCI Gang Box.

my only question is does nec permit me to use the rear knockouts in the electrical box and hide the clamp inside the wall or do I have to use a side knockout and have an exposed Romex Wire visible from inside the cabinet?
 
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Old 09-03-18, 11:53 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

A basic undercabinet range hood can be connected to a nearby lighting circuit.
The wiring is connected directly into the back of the unit.

A range hood/microwave oven needs its own circuit.
In that case..... you'd set a receptacle in the cabinet above to plug it in.
 
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Old 09-03-18, 12:13 PM
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The wiring is connected directly into the back of the unit.
Many times I have installed the receptacle in the upper cabinet and put a appliance cord on the range hood. Basically connecting it similar to an over the range microwave.
 
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Old 09-03-18, 03:40 PM
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Thanks for the quick response. My question is more about having the wire leave the box through a rear knockout and being mounted flush with that edge against a wood cabinet back. How do you mount your.boxes?
 
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Old 09-03-18, 04:39 PM
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You can have the connector come out the back of the box and into the wall or cabinet.
You need to keep the hole small or you won't have anything to screw the box to.
 
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Old 09-03-18, 05:00 PM
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I had planned on drilling a 1 inch hole through the back of the cabinet ( its solid wood )and then screwing the back of a 2 1/8 metal box in the two diagonal screws. I guess its safe because clamps are hidden in the walls anyway for the most part with other boxes. Sounds good to you?
 
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Old 09-03-18, 06:10 PM
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Connector s into the back of the the box are fine.
 
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Old 09-03-18, 06:28 PM
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Thanks everybody I'll start on this project as soon as I have all the materials
 
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Old 09-10-18, 05:36 AM
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Looks like if you use a plug you need a dedicated electrical branch wire. 422.16 (4) if you run romex to it you dont. I installed the box with outlets in it but will add a clamp for the romex so it's to code

(4) Range Hoods. Range hoods shall be permitted to be cordand-plug-connected with a flexible cord identifed as suitable
for use on range hoods in the installation instructions of the
appliance manufacturer, where all of the following conditions
are met:
(1) The flexible cord is terminated with a grounding-type
attachment plug.
Exception: A listed range hood distinctly marked to identify it as protec‐
ted by a system of double insulation shall not be required to be termina‐
ted with a grounding-type attachment plug.
(2) The length of the cord is not less than 450 mm (18 in.)
and not over 1.2 m (4 ft).
(3) Receptacles are located to protect against physical
damage to the flexible cord.
4) The receptacle is accessible
(5) The receptacle is supplied by an individual branch
circuit.
 
 

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