Under cabinet lamp wire hardwiring

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Old 09-14-18, 06:42 PM
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Under cabinet lamp wire hardwiring

I have spent an hour trying to research this and canít get a definitive answer. I have undercabinet led puck lights that have a plug that can be removed to hardwire. The problem is I canít seem to wrap my brain around how to hardwire it and also attach to a dimmer switch.

My initial plan was to wire a new plug up in my cabinet, then wire it to a dimmer switch. Found out this is a no-no, so now I want to hardwire directly to a 14/2 wire. Is there is legit way to bring an outside lamp wire into a box to wire to internal wiring?
 
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Old 09-14-18, 07:19 PM
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If the fixture has a cord and plug on it..... it needs to be plugged in. Cutting the cord or the plug off and splicing to it is not an approved wiring method. In the past we pulled NM (romex) cable in the walls, had it come out directly under the cabinet and connected to the fixture.

Now for old work we use low voltage LED fixtures. We install a receptacle inside the cabinet and plug in the low voltage transformer. Then almost any type of low voltage wiring can be used to interconnect them.
 
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Old 09-14-18, 07:35 PM
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It is actually advertised as direct wire as it has one of those Christmas light plug connectors that stabs the wire when attached. Pulling that off leaves simple lamp wire.

Im fine plugging it in, but my wife wants them on a dimmer, which I read isnít allowed for outlets.
 
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Old 09-14-18, 09:37 PM
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You can hardwire it, but the splice has to be in the junction box.
Some undercabinet lights has optional junction box that you can purchase separately.

Personally, I'd rather work with low voltage models. With low voltage, you can splice without using junction box. I hide the splice in gap between the cabinets.
For the power supply, I usually install a switch controlled outlet in the cabinet holding hood or microwave oven.
 
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Old 09-15-18, 05:54 AM
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Hi, this link may be an option.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2PXk3na4ps
Geo
 
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Old 09-15-18, 11:37 AM
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Thanks for the replies. The solution is probably obvious, but the issue I have is how I take an external lamp wire to a behind drywall junction box. Is there a faceplate or something that would allow me to bring it in through the front of the box and still secure it so it couldnt be pulled out?
 
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Old 09-15-18, 11:45 AM
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Hi, you canít use lamp cord for permanent wiring.
Geo
 
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Old 09-15-18, 12:32 PM
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Thanks geochurchi. Makes sense, but what doesnít make sense is Iím looking at the package right now and the main selling point is ďplug-in or direct wireĒ. What could they possibly mean then if the wire cannot be direct wired? Even the picture next to it has a plug and then two bare wires showing it can be hardwired. The other thing that doesnít make sense is I hung a new chandelier last night that uses lamp wire, so based on that apparently you can permanent wire lamp wire or that company couldnít sell their product legally, right?
 
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Old 09-15-18, 01:26 PM
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how I take an external lamp wire to a behind drywall junction box.
You can't.
It has to be spliced under or inside of the cabinet.

That is why I suggest low voltage models. With low voltage, your splice can be hidden easily and there are low voltage wires you can install behind drywall. i use 18/2 thermostat wires.
 
 

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