moving electrical panel requirements

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Old 09-25-18, 09:57 AM
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moving electrical panel requirements

We are renovating a kitchen. The current electric panel sits in an area where the refrigerator will eventually be and this prevents proper opening of the panel and isn't compliant due to the space needed to stand in front of the panel when working on it.
I am wondering if I could somehow make it a sub panel and then place a 100A disconnect box on a different wall and run wire from the disconnect box to the sub panel. If any real work needs to be done on the sub panel, the fridge can always be pulled out but the main disconnect would provide the requirement for being able to turn off electricity in an emergency?

If not, I have to move the panel and then it will be difficult to connect all the existing wires without using a giant junction box.
 
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Old 09-25-18, 11:01 AM
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If I do that I would need to run conduit from the new panel to the existing?
How many wires can I put in a big conduit like a 1.25" or would you just run all the wires in the wall/floor?
 
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Old 09-25-18, 11:50 AM
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Yes running conduit to the new panel would be the best option. If it's a short run (usually less than 2 feet) you don't have to worry about conduit fill or derating. If the conduit run is longer than 2', you'll need to do some calculations based on how many circuits you'll be pulling and their amperage. For long runs, it may be better to run two or three smaller conduits than one big one.
 
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Old 09-25-18, 12:04 PM
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I deleted my
post because I didn't realize the panel was the main panel.
 
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Old 09-25-18, 02:46 PM
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If you choose to move main panel, you can still use it as a large junction box as ray suggested in now deleted post.
The issue here is that you will have to run new main feed cable to new panel's location. It should still should be possible to make splice in the existing breaker panel if it is large enough.

You don't have to run a conduit. Sometimes it is easier with conduit and sometimes it is not, especially if there will be many turns. You will have to decide what is easier in your case.

Here is conduit fill calculator, but it does not include NM-b cable as they are usually not run in a conduit.
Conduit Fill Calculator - Best Online Conduit Fill Calculator

You will have to make your best judgement to keep the cable from jamming inside of the conduit.
 
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Old 09-25-18, 03:08 PM
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The subpanel would still need the same workspace as the service.
 
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Old 09-25-18, 05:47 PM
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The subpanel would still need the same workspace as the service.
I will repeat for clarity: A sub panel has the same clearance requirements as a main panel. You cannot have the panel behind a fridge. All panels must be readily accessible (See NED definition)

Can you turn the panel to the other side of the wall? Perhaps install an outdoor panel?
 
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Old 09-25-18, 08:21 PM
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But if I make it a big splice box instead of a sub panel then it doesn't have the same requirements. It's just a junction box then that is accessible by removing the fridge?
tbh, might be easier just to run new cable and rewire 70% of the place given the renovations...

The wall on the outside is a shed so didn'td have the space requirements either sadly...
 
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Old 09-25-18, 09:11 PM
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But if I make it a big splice box instead of a sub panel then it doesn't have the same requirements. It's just a junction box then that is accessible by removing the fridge?
Correct.

Pulling new cable may be better if majority of cables are visible and accessible.
 
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