Another power to shed thread

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  #1  
Old 09-28-18, 12:15 PM
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Another power to shed thread

I have a 50' run of 1" PVC buried 18" from my house to my shed.

My home built in 1960 has NO grounds at the outlets, knob and tube. I can get power from the panel by installing a breaker that turns one space into two breakers, did it for my Jacuzzi, easy. Just need lights in the shed inside, two outlets and two motion detector ones outside, not planning on running anything that uses a lot of power. I am planning to also do a GFI

What gauge of wire to the shed.
Do I need a 8' ground rod at the shed.
What size breaker in the panel inside the house.
Do I need a shut off at the shed.
What did I miss.

Thanks!
 
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Old 09-28-18, 01:40 PM
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The max amps you can have without getting into having a subpanel is 20 amps. That will be #12 copper THHN/THWN wire using a 20A breaker. No ground rods are needed but you do need a disconnect switch at the shed.
 
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Old 09-28-18, 04:08 PM
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Just two wires from the house to the shed?
 
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Old 09-28-18, 05:24 PM
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1960 has NO grounds at the outlets, knob and tube
A house built in 1960 is WELL past the use of knob and tube. Knob and tube wiring was mostly pre 1940 I believe. Are you 100% sure you have knob and tube and not some other ungrounded wiring? The house I grew up in was early 60's and had Flexible metal conduit as a wiring method and ungrounded receptacles.
 
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Old 09-28-18, 06:43 PM
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If just 120V is needed then you need 3 conductors, 1 hot(black), 1 neutral(white) and 1 ground(green).
 
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Old 09-29-18, 07:07 AM
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Yes its knob and tube, I have lived here for 25 years.
 
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Old 09-29-18, 07:16 AM
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"If just 120V is needed then you need 3 conductors, 1 hot(black), 1 neutral(white) and 1 ground(green)."

Where does the ground go if my house is only a 2 wire system? 8' ground rod outside the shed?
 
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Old 09-29-18, 07:53 AM
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Even though your branch circuits are ungrounded, your electrical service is still grounded by the neutral wire from the power company. That is why the neutral is also called the "grounded conductor". Neutral a ground conductors are connect to the same bus in the main panel.
 
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Old 09-29-18, 08:25 AM
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Ground rods are for diverting lighting strikes. Gound wire in circuits and feeders known as equipment grounds are for fault current to assure breakers trip,
 
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