Breaker panel.

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Old 10-08-18, 04:40 PM
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Breaker panel.

My 1/3 hp septic tank effluent pump blew and I replaced it with a 1/2 hp model and replaced the float switch at the same time. For some unknown reason it was/is powered by a 15 amp dipole breaker along with several receptacles, light fixtures and outlets. Doesn't sound like 'code of the west' to me. Anyway the new 1/2 hp doesn't care for this breaker and tends to pop if regularly. I need a breaker with more amps but the box has no empty slots. Is it worthwhile to replace the 15 amp dipole, leaving the circuits in place, with something stouter and, if so, how stout? I have a couple of 30 amp breakers in my shop but the distance is about 150 ft - too far?
 
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Old 10-08-18, 04:44 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Not sure what a dipole breaker is.
You can't randomly increase a breaker size.
The breaker amperage is dictated by the gauge of the wiring.

It sounds like that pump may be on a #14 gauge/15A circuit which means it may require you to run a new 20A circuit on #12 wiring.
 
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Old 10-08-18, 05:44 PM
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My mistake - meant a 2 pole breaker. Since I have no openings in the breaker box for a new one, what did you think of the 150 ft 12/3 run from the 30 amp breaker in my shop - currently nothing on it.
 
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Old 10-08-18, 06:10 PM
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For some unknown reason it was/is powered by a 15 amp dipole breaker along with several receptacles, light fixtures and outlets.
You probably have a multiwire branch circuit (MWBC). You can get 2 circuits with shared neutral out of 14/3 on a 2 pole breaker.


what did you think of the 150 ft 12/3 run from the 30 amp breaker in my shop - currently nothing on it.
You will have to replace the breaker to 20A to use 12AWG.
You don't need 12/3 for 120V. What you need is 12/2.

All wiring on the circuit will have to be 12 AWG, so you will have to run a dedicated line to the pump instead of connecting to existing circuit.
 
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Old 10-09-18, 06:32 AM
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Hi, what is the nameplate info on that pump? FLA.
Geo
 
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Old 10-09-18, 02:41 PM
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Goulds PE51M - 1/2 hp - 115V - 9.5 amp - single phase - min circuit breaker - 20 amp.
 
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Old 10-10-18, 09:54 AM
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If you would take the lights and receptacles off the circuit you could just change the breaker to 20 amps.
 
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Old 10-13-18, 06:12 PM
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Hypothetical question. Could I have two 12/2 UF lines from my shop (150 ft) to the septic pump and float switch - one for each. If so, should I change the existing 30 amp breakers for 20's?
 
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Old 10-13-18, 06:37 PM
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Hi, you must change to 20 Amp breakers as long as you are using #12 conductors.
Geo
 
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Old 10-13-18, 08:08 PM
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#12 can only be on a 20 amp breaker except for special circumstances.
 
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Old 10-14-18, 10:38 AM
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For some unknown reason it was/is powered by a 15 amp dipole breaker along with several receptacles, light fixtures and outlets.

Where are these receptacles and lights? #14 wire on a 15 amp breaker was correct for the original 1/3 HP motor, but since you upgraded to a 1/2 HP motor the requirements have changed. If the lights and receptacles are near the source for the circuit you need to find them another circuit to be added to so that the motor circuit is dedicated to just the motor. Then, all you have to do is replace the 15 amp breaker with a 20 amp breaker. My motor data calculator calls for #14 wire on a 20 amp breaker for the 1/2 HP motor.
 
 

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