FMC Metal Clad for outdoor along wall under rafters?

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  #1  
Old 10-09-18, 10:11 AM
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FMC Metal Clad for outdoor along wall under rafters?

I'm trying to run some lighting and receptacles to the front of the house. My plan is to run wire from panel straight up the wall then horizontal under the roof rafters to front. I do plan to drop a few "T"s and bring them down for receptacles as well. Receptacles will be GFCI protected.

My questions:
1. Southwire 12/2 CU MC Metal Clad for outdoor along wall under rafters? It seems more cost effective to use this rather than buying 12g THHN wire and conduit.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Southwir...4701/202316315

2. At the "T" drop down for receptacles, I understand it needs to be water tight, so I plan to use PVC from the T coming down with plastic Gang boxes with covers.

Please help.

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 10-09-18, 12:09 PM
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Neither FMC (flexible metal conduit) nor MC (metallic cable) is rated for outdoor use. If you want a flexible option you can use liquidtight conduit or UF-B cable as long as it is mounted away from damage. Other than that, THWN in PVC or EMT conduit is the way to go.
 
  #3  
Old 10-09-18, 12:35 PM
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There aren't many choices for 12g THWN wires. Only Southwire Coilpak in 2000ft roll at $280/roll, and I'll need Green, Black, and Red, with taxes, it comes to about $1k.

I can't even use THHN wire inside PVC conduit? According to a previous post, you can use THHN wires, sold by HOMEDEPOT, post #7 https://www.doityourself.com/forum/e...-question.html

What other choices are there for THWN besides Southwire CoilPAK?

I can't find much availability on THWN, but most site list this THHN as dual THHN/THWN but on the packaging, it's only THHN.
https://www.mscdirect.com/product/de...46459?fromRR=Y
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Southwir...4158/203401696

Is using UF-B wire inside PVC conduit proper code? I'd love to use this, since the cost is the least.
 

Last edited by divinity; 10-09-18 at 12:52 PM.
  #4  
Old 10-09-18, 02:53 PM
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UF cable.in conduit is.going.to be a pia to.pull. Most THHN is dual rated.THHN/THWN...

Do not.try.to splice.in a.T. They're i is not.enough room.
 
  #5  
Old 10-09-18, 03:19 PM
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I have read from other posts that it is acceptable, or even suggested as 'better', to strip the outer wraps from UF-B so they are individual wires, which will allow more room and is easier to pull?
 
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Old 10-09-18, 04:09 PM
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Stripping the sheath off UF should only be done at the junction box. It is not.to be stripped in conduit.
 
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Old 10-09-18, 04:28 PM
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That DIY link you left is extremely old. Back then THHN and THWN were two completely different wires. Today most are dual rated. As far as I know.... all of Depot's wire is dual rated. What is labeled as Southwire THHN is dual rated according to their product brochure.

Southwire® SIMpull THHN® copper conductors are made with soft drawn copper. Sizes 14 through 4/0 AWG use a combination-unilay stranding while 250 kcmil and larger sizes use a compressed copper stranding. The wire is covered with a tough heat and moisture resistant PVC insulation with an overall nylon jacket utilizing SIMpull® Technology.

Southwire
 
  #8  
Old 10-10-18, 08:11 AM
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My run is fairly short, with just a 90 turn between each "T"s and I'll be using 3/4 PVC conduit, so I don't think pulling will be an issue. I'll go with the most cost effective route, using UF-B 12g wires with stripping the sheath off at junction boxes and T's only.

Thanks everyone for your help.
 
  #9  
Old 10-10-18, 01:09 PM
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Pretty much any of the home stores, hardwares or electrical supply houses will sell you THWN by the foot. No need to buy full spools.

UF is allowed in conduit, but can be tough to pull around bends. It's probably OK for a short run.
 
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