Wiring electrical outlets

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Old 11-10-18, 10:59 AM
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Wiring electrical outlets

So I'm going to be rewiring all of my house but the bathroom and kitchen because those are already grounded circuits and the rest is knob and tube wiring. I've done electrical work before but only helped install 240v baseboard heaters.

My question is can I run the wires to one outlet and continue them on to another outlet via one set of the screws on the outlet. So say the bottom hot and neutral screws going to the next outlet or so I have to do the pigtail method?
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Old 11-10-18, 11:24 AM
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can I run the wires to one outlet and continue them on to another outlet via one set of the screws on the outlet.
That is the way it is normally done.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 02:08 PM
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Alright thank you for the answer. I just don't want to mess up and have to redo it all. I'm not paying 6000 for an electrician to wire my house when I can do it myself.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 03:43 PM
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Make sure you read up on code requirements for receptacle spacing and dedicated circuits. Things have changed significantly since your house was wired, so you'll need (and want) to follow the new requirements.

* Receptacle every 12', and 6' from doorways (probably more depending on your room layout)
* 20A circuit for laundry
* AFCI required for many/all circuits
 
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Old 11-10-18, 03:52 PM
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via one set of the screws on the outlet
And only use the screws. And only one wire under each screw. Do not use the push-in connections that are on some devices. They are not secure and can cause problems.

If you are branching to more than one location in different directions and you have more than two wires to connect to a device, you should use wire nuts to connect each set of wires (hot, neutral, ground) with short pigtails to the device.

Also read up on how big boxes need to be (cubic inches) for number of wires entering and devices contained.

You should also check to see if a permit is required for rewiring (as compared with new wiring--i.e. wiring to new locations where outlets, etc. did not exist before.) in your area. When I did some work at my house I was surprised to find out that old outlets being rewired were not counted for my permit--only new ones being installed.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 11:29 PM
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Thanks again for the info. I did contact the local building code authority and he said I do need a permit. It's only like 30$ for a year. Almost all of my current wiring is ran through the partial finished basement so I just planned on doing it like that again buy my wife gave me the okay to just redo the entire living room in drywall instead of that cheap plywood type board.
So I'm thinking I will just run it through the studs to save on some wire maybe. The only thing I'm worried about is the upstairs. I do have a wire snake for wall fishing because I used to be a cable installer. But I hate wall fishing.
 
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Old 11-11-18, 12:33 AM
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I hate wall fishing
Probably most can be done from the attic, On uninsulated walls just a string and a weight will work if you remove the box, .
 
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Old 11-11-18, 01:14 PM
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Also another question. I'm probably going to upgrade my breaker box to 150 or 200amp but I don't think my house has a ground rod so I know I need that too. Do I have to take the ground wire all the way through the wall and ground it to the breaker box or to the meter base? I know when I installed cable we would ground to the rod but if we couldn't get to it then we did the meter base.
 
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Old 11-11-18, 08:27 PM
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If you upgrade the breaker box to 150 or 200A, you'll need to upgrade your service entry as well.

Grounding/bonding will likely need to be upgraded as well. You'll need 2 ground rods connected to the main breaker box. In addition, your incoming water line (if metal) will need to be bonded, along with jumpers across the water heater.

Some areas require the ground rods to the meter pan, but most will go to the main panel.

Unfortunately a service upgrade/replacement isn't usually a DIY project since you need to either connect to the aerial cables from the pole, something you don't want to be doing without the right training and protective equipment. Or you can have the POCO disconnect and reconnect, but unless planned really wall, it can mean a day or a few without power.
 
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Old 11-12-18, 12:09 PM
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But I hate wall fishing.
I love walleye fishing!
 
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Old 11-14-18, 01:41 AM
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Okay so I do need two ground rods then? My friend from work is an electrician and will be running the show as far as the breaker box. I called my electric company and they do disconnect and reconnect for upgrades for free and I just need to give 24hr notice. I already have the entry cable priced out, ground rods, and wire for them and all I need.

My only problem is the fact that I would either have to get it all done in a day or if the inspector will let me do a room or two at a time. My plan was to do thr living room first because we also are replacing the walls with drywall. Then move onto the dining room because we are replacing those walls too and I have 2 outlets that don't work in it right now.

​​​​​​Then I was going to so our bedroom and finally the upstairs later on because I have to repair the entire upstairs.

But I'm not sure if I can do that. I figured I would just keep the current wire in place for the rooms I'm not working on, and then the ones I am doing fix them and then put the new breakers in for those circuits. So that way I can have power to the rest of the house since it is becoming winter.

We wanted a fixer upper but didn't realize the electric was this bad and other crap. The inspector did not do her job at all..
 
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Old 11-14-18, 03:06 AM
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To reduce time without power you could install a new service next to your existing service. Then just have the power company swap the drop to the new.. You could use the old box as a splice box. Once the drop is switched you can move cortical circuits first to the new panel with power. Less than an hour that way to get critical circuits up. You can even run but not connect some wires for critical circuits to the soon to be splice box.
 
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Old 11-17-18, 10:01 AM
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Oh that sounds awesome! I will have to ask my friend about that.
 
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Old 11-17-18, 10:24 AM
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Many.agencies want.to see.two inspections. One called a.rough in where the cables.and boxes.are.run.and a.final where everything is installed and working. The inspector may.not.have the time.or.want.to.come.out for every room
 
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Old 11-27-18, 09:40 PM
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Alright thank you. I have a friend coming over tomorrow to help me start this project, he is an electrician and is just giving me tips
 
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Old 11-27-18, 09:46 PM
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You need to get a rough-in inspection before you close up the walls and hide the wiring. An inspector should come out several times if needed. There would only be one final inspection and that's when everything is finished.
 
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