Breakers feeding A/C

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Old 11-16-18, 12:25 PM
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Breakers feeding A/C

I just noticed in my main panel that my A/C is fed by 2 15amp breakers. The circuit leads to a fuse box next to my condenser. The breakers are not connected. I'm wondering whether this was supposed to be a double pole breaker. If 30 amps was needed why wouldn't a 30 amp breaker be put in? The breakers are thin so they only take up the place of one regular size breaker and so it would seem that they are on the same pole. I didn't remove them to see whether that is true or not. Are there places on a panel where two thin breakers are on different poles? Does this setup seem correct? It is a GE panel
 
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Old 11-16-18, 12:36 PM
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The breakers should be handle tied so both trip at the same time or a double pole 15 amp breaker should have been used.

If 30 amps was needed why wouldn't a 30 amp breaker be put in?
It doesn't work that way. You need two 15 amp breakers because the AC needs 240 volts at 15 amps not 30 amps at 120 volts.
 
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Old 11-16-18, 05:35 PM
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The breakers are thin so they only take up the place of one regular size breaker and so it would seem that they are on the same pole. I didn't remove them to see whether that is true or not. Are there places on a panel where two thin breakers are on different poles?
Yes...... you could have two thin breakers in the A bus and two in the B bus. The two next to each other (bottom A and top B) would be 240v.

Pretty surprising your central A/C even ran on 15A breakers.
 
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Old 11-16-18, 06:31 PM
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Are you sure the breaker is really for the A/C? It is very common for the panel index to be labeled wrong. I would be surprised that an A/C requiring a 30 amp circuit would run on a 15 amp circuit. Is it possible that the 15 amp breaker is really to the furnace or air handler?
 
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Old 11-17-18, 09:56 AM
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I wasn't going by labels in the main panel; I only have one circuit that was added by way of conduit from my main panel and that was when I had the A/C installed some 14 years ago. Wires from those two breakers are the only wires that enter the conduit so it would seem that's the only power being fed to A/C---two thin 15amp from one bus and none from the other bus bar. Is anyone familiar enough with a GE panel to know whether there is a place in the panel where two thin breakers would be connected to both poles while being on the same side? Sorry, I don't know the lingo. They are not opposite each other but both on left side.
 

Last edited by mickeyrory; 11-17-18 at 10:18 AM.
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Old 11-17-18, 10:39 AM
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Is anyone familiar enough with a GE panel to know whether there is a place in the panel where two thin breakers would be connected to both poles while being on the same side? Sorry, I don't know the lingo. They are not opposite each other but both on left side.

Both breakers being on one side isn't necessarily a problem. Obviously they are delivering 240 volts to the A-C condenser or it wouldn't have worked for the last 14 years. But, those two breakers should be replaced with a 2 pole breaker such as a THQP215, a 15 amp 2-pole breaker. Here is a picture of what you need.


https://www.galco.com/buy/GE-General...BoCInwQAvD_BwE
 
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Old 11-17-18, 12:07 PM
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Casual Joe, Thanks! I will replace it.
 
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Old 11-17-18, 05:19 PM
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You should also check the nameplate on the A/C unit to see what it requires.
If it's running on a 15A circuit it's most likely a ductless A/C system.
 
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