Grounding meter socket

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-28-18, 04:28 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Grounding meter socket

hey all, Iím upgrading my service and installing a homeline 200 amp panel directly adjacent to a 200 amp lever bypass Millbank socket (required by POCO). Iím landing my grounding electrodes within the service panel but Iím confused by a bonding strap from inside the socket. ďWHEN SERVICE IS NOT GROUNDED REMOVE BONDING STRAP AND RE-INSTALL SCREWĒ What do they mean by this? It looks like the bonding strap removed would bond the case to nuetral. The service ground and neutral are bonded within the panel by the grounding screw. Is Millbank saying I should remove this strap if NO grounding exists? Are they saying to remove the strap if Iím not landing my gec within the meter socket? Also, I understand, I think, that Iím not supposed to run a jumper between the socket and panel as any faults return on ground to the bonded service panel then out on the neutral? My raceway between then two will most likely be 2Ē schedule 80 and not metal, about a six inch run. Also, I have underground service of that matters. Single phase obviously. Thanks in advance.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-28-18, 07:10 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,011
Received 66 Votes on 58 Posts
What do they mean by this?
The bonding strap bonds the steel can of the meter socket to the grounded conductor (the neutral). This is correct for your service as it is grounded.

Is Millbank saying I should remove this strap if NO grounding exists?
Yes, but your service is grounded so you leave the strap.

Also, I understand, I think, that I’m not supposed to run a jumper between the socket and panel as any faults return on ground to the bonded service panel then out on the neutral?
If you have a metallic path (conduit or fitting) between the meter socket and panel, and that metallic path is going through concentric or eccentric knock outs, then you are required to bond around the KO's. This is normally done using grounding bushings connected to jumpers in the meter socket and panel. Since you are using PVC then you do not need to do anything else. Both the panel and meter socket are bonded to the neutral which is where the ground is derived from, along with the ground rod at the panel, ground rod at the power companies transformer, and anything else that is part of the grounding system.
 
  #3  
Old 11-29-18, 08:38 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Why would a service NOT be grounded? Just curious if there is ever a situation where you would need to bond the socket to the enclosure? If I do wind up using a metallic conduit allís I need to do is use a bonding bushing and attach it to the bus?
 
  #4  
Old 11-30-18, 10:52 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 10,212
Received 38 Votes on 30 Posts
Why would a service NOT be grounded?

I believe in some parts of the country a 3-wire 3-phase service might still be available where none of the conductors are grounded.


The service ground and neutral are bonded within the panel by the grounding screw.

It sounds as if you landed the GEC on a ground bar instead of the neutral bus, that is wrong. The GEC must be landed "On" the neutral bus. There is a large terminal hole just for this on the neutral bus. The bonding screw is to bond the grounded neutral bus to the panel box.
 
  #5  
Old 11-30-18, 01:46 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I haven't done it yet but will be landing the gec to the ground terminal between left and right busses right next to the lug for the neutral. I was under the impression that with the bonding screw it bonds the ground and neutral busses to the enclosure and it is only to be done at the first disconnect from the meter. In a main service panel the left and right busses can be used interchangeably because they are bonded but on a sub panel they have to be separate? Sorry if these are ignorant questions, just trying to teach myself.
 
  #6  
Old 11-30-18, 02:21 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,944
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
Yes in a subpanel the ground and neutral buses are physically separate. The neutral bus(es) will be isolated from the metal case with plastic brackets. Left, right, top, bottom is all different depending on manufacturer of the panel, but the important characteristics are that the ground bar is bonded to the metal box and the neutral bar stands off.

Yes in the main panel the neutral and ground are bonded, but they can't always be used interchangeably. Grounds can be landed in either bar, but neutrals can only be landed on the neutral bar. This practice keeps objectionable current from flowing through the panel box metal.
 
  #7  
Old 12-01-18, 11:48 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Iím glad I asked, is there a way to differentiate the ground bar from the nuetral. Itís a homeline 30/60 panel. I donít think it came with a spec sheet
 
  #8  
Old 12-02-18, 08:29 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,011
Received 66 Votes on 58 Posts
I normally buy and install separate ground bars that I attach to the can of the panel and leave the other bars as neutral bars. It is always handy to have more holes to connect wires to.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: