Main and subpanel of mobile home

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Old 12-08-18, 05:00 AM
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Main and subpanel of mobile home

First, let me say I'll be using an electrician for all connections. However, I'm trying to obtain a basic understanding of the theory behind a mobile home connection. I'm installing an old portable classroom (on land without any other structures) to be used as a printing shop. The classroom has a 125 amp panel installed inside. Since this was a classroom, there aren't a tremendous amount of outlets since it was basically lights and an A/C being used. I'll be needing more drops for outlets since I'll have a number of printers, heat presses, etc. The vast majority of the equipment is 120V equipment, but there is the potential for some 220V equipment. Since building is considered a mobile home where I live, I will have the meter can and main breaker/load panel outside. I have a friend that has a new GE 150Amp/4 space load center he's willing to give to me. My question is, since I'll have quite a bit of equipment inside (even though it all won't be operating at max load at the same time), should I pass on the load center and upgrade to 200 amp load center with more breaker spaces? The outside breakers are used for outside only, or do they feed inside equipment as well? I guess I'm locked-up on how the panels interrelate. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 12-08-18, 05:05 AM
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The service is outside closest to the meter. The receptacles and lights are fed from the inside panel. Whether you need 200 amps would be determined by a demand load calculation.
 
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Old 12-08-18, 05:39 AM
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Most MH outside panels only have space for 2-4 breakers besides the main cut off. If I understand correctly [painter not electrician] you could use a 150 amp service but would put a 125 amp breaker below it feed the MH.
 
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Old 12-08-18, 09:23 AM
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Thanks for the reply. So am I capped at whatever size main breaker is inside, outside or a combination? In other words, let's assume the calculations determine I need 200 amp service, would I need to upgrade the interior panel to 200 amps or would the 125 be sufficient if the exterior is 200 amps? I guess I'm struggling with how the two "mains" interact.
 
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Old 12-08-18, 09:44 AM
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If you needed 200 on the sub panel you would need a 200 amp main and the wire to the sub panel would have to be sized for 200a.
 
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Old 12-08-18, 01:48 PM
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I wonder how a.building without cooking and sleeping areas is considered a home. It does not meet the code definition.
 
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Old 12-08-18, 02:04 PM
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Have permit in hand. Which code are you referring to, building or electrical?
 
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Old 12-08-18, 02:07 PM
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It is likely not a mobile home, but is a temporary building that was used as a classroom (as mentioned). However, the codes would likely be similar as far as having a outside panel near the unit as a disconnect.

The inside panel and wire would need to be sized by the feeder from the outdoor panel, as Ray mentioned.
 
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Old 12-08-18, 02:23 PM
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Tolyn is correct. It's a 24' X 36' steel framed building that is built like a modular (has a Department of Community Affairs sticker which indicates a modular in Florida) but is built on a frame, has two sides that are married in the middle and has triple axles under it. Therefore, the county permits it like a mobile home. I did have to put a shower in the bathroom and a small kitchen. This unit is a lot easier to convert than the storage container homes that are becoming popular now.
 
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