Running two 14/2 wires in same room on separate breakers.

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  #1  
Old 01-10-19, 09:39 PM
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Running two 14/2 wires in same room on separate breakers.

Hey All,

There's probably a very obvious and simple solution to this but I just can't see the forest through the trees.

I would like to run two separate 14/2 wires in a single room along the same two walls to provide more power to a few things I will have there like exercise equipment, gaming systems for kids and other equipment that will chew up a bit of wattage. How do I wire this while maintaining 12 feet between recepticles on the same circuit? A few options that I'm thinking:

1) Break the tab on each recepticle and run a separate wire to each terminal. ( I think this will be unsafe and not to electrical code. I'm guessing each recepticle has to be on a totally separate breaker. Doesn't sound safe either: one breaker only turns off half of the recepticle. )

2) Run two wires and stagger each receptacle at every 6 feet? Will look messy and the wall will be littered with receptacles.

3) Leave receptacles at 12 feet (or less) apart but run one wire to the odd numbered receptacles and the second wire to the even numbered receptacles?

I can only place the wire continuously on 2 of the 4 walls. The other walls have too many doors and is where the most foot traffic will be.

Other suggestions then 1-3?

Suggestions appreciated!

Regards,
AT
 
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  #2  
Old 01-10-19, 11:27 PM
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A multi wire circuit would be a good solution. You run 3-conductor cable (not wire) from a 2-pole breaker or two handle tied single pole breaker. The neutral is shared.

At the receptacle you would break the brass tab. Red to one plug-in of the receptacle and black to the other. If it continues down stream to another receptacles you would connect line and line out to a pigtail and the pigtail to the receptacle
 
  #3  
Old 01-11-19, 04:22 AM
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Most new circuits call for afci protection which is not easily available in a two pole breaker.

The receptacles do not need to be 12 foot apart. That is the maximum distance between them.
 
  #4  
Old 01-11-19, 06:25 AM
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1. perfectly legal if you use a double pole breaker or handle tie so both breakers go off together.
2. perfectly legal as well.
3. perfectly legal as well.

A multi wire circuit would be a better option. Run one 14/3 cable instead of two 14/2 cables. You only cut the hot side tab if you want split receptacles.
Or you can put two receptacles in a box and wire the red to one and the black to the other.
Receptacles can be placed anywhere you want as you have the minimum spacing of no wall space more than 6 feet from a receptacle. If you have one spot where a lot of devices will be plugged in, add more receptacles there.
 
  #5  
Old 01-11-19, 06:44 AM
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Note: If you choose not to use a ground fault circuit interrupter breaker or arc fault interrupter breaker, then individual GFCI and AFCI receptacles along a multiwire branch circuit (12-3 or 14-3 cable). can serve only one outlet box each with load terminals left empty.

You could run the 14-3 from the panel to the first outlet box where you have a GFCI for half the circuit, for example red-white. From there seperate 14-2 cables continue on, one from the load terminals of the GFCI receptacle. At the second outlet box the other half (for example black-white) has its GFCI with 14-2 continuing from its load terminals. Now you have GFCI protection on both halves and separate 14-2's continue along the wall, either going into the next box or leapfrogging around the outside of the box depending on whether that sub-branch is to have a (n ordinary) receptacle there. No receptacles are split between both sub-branches.

If both sub-branches enter a (double gang) box where both will have receptacles, the neutrals are not combined although all ground wires are combined. The network of wires attached to the load terminals of a GFCI (or AFCI) is treated as if it were an independent branch circuit, with neither hot nor neutral combined with wires from other parts of the house including from the same general area.

If you need that many receptacles, your choice whether to have double gang boxes 12' apart or single gang boxes 6' apart.

A section of wall more than 2' wide between doors needs a receptacle. Cables will need to strung up and over the door headers or come down from the attic, etc. as needed. You will probably be glad you put some receptacles along those walls with all the doors, say to put a big fan in a doorway to air out an area on one side or the other, or to plug in a vacuum cleaner.

.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 01-11-19 at 07:07 AM.
  #6  
Old 01-11-19, 07:50 AM
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Why not add up the potential loads of what may be on at the same time to see what power you need? You may find that one 20A circuit using 12/2 wire may be enough.
 
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Old 01-11-19, 10:34 PM
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Thanks Guy's.

Couple of hints I was given is not to run a 12/2 wire on a 20A AFCI breaker since the inspector may not pass the space without a valid reason for the higher gage cable, breaker and receptacles. Two cables allows for a total of 30A anyway. From that perspective it seems I'll be better off with two cables then.

Was told here in Ontario, Canada that GFCI / AFCI breakers are preferred over GFCI / AFCI receptacles . An AFCI breaker and a GFCI receptacle followed by standard receptacles will do and pass easily however.

Can I really share one neutral on 14-3 cables if the red and black are connected to alternating receptacles and connect to separate 15A breakers? Thought the return path should be of the same gage as the wire bringing power in.

For the comment "A section of wall more than 2' wide between doors needs a receptacle." would that apply in Ontario, Canada as well?

Realizing now that option 3) can't work because one of the cables will be 24 feet between the receptacle and the panel.

Cheers,
TK
 

Last edited by ArchT; 01-11-19 at 10:39 PM. Reason: Typos
  #8  
Old 01-11-19, 10:46 PM
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Thought the return path should be of the same gage as the wire bringing power in.
The white is the same size as the black and red. The white only carries the difference between the two hots not total return amps. Example if you have 7a on black and 10a on red white only carries 3a.
 
  #9  
Old 01-12-19, 07:02 AM
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Thanks Guy's.

Couple of hints I was given is not to run a 12/2 wire on a 20A AFCI breaker since the inspector may not pass the space without a valid reason for the higher gage cable, breaker and receptacles. Two cables allows for a total of 30A anyway. From that perspective it seems I'll be better off with two cables then.

Was told here in Ontario, Canada that GFCI / AFCI breakers are preferred over GFCI / AFCI receptacles . An AFCI breaker and a GFCI receptacle followed by standard receptacles will do and pass easily however.

(snip)

Realizing now that option 3) can't work because one of the cables will be 24 feet between the receptacle and the panel.

Cheers,
TK
I am not familiar with the CEC or any additional city codes that may apply to you but at least in the U.S. ...

"Guys" plural does not take an apostrophe.

I would be surprised that an inspector, after taking out his crystal ball, would find it a certainty that you will never have a total load exceeding 12 amps continuous or 15 amps intermittent in the room so as to disqualify a 20 amp 12 gauge circuit. However certain branch circuits also powering lights might not be allowed to be 20 amps.

As I mentioned earlier, a ground fault circuit interrupter receptacle cannot be followed by regular receptacles also requiring GFCI protection if you use one 14-3 (or 12-3) cable (as a multiwire branch circuit) although the GFCI receptacle can be so followed if you use separate 14-2 (or 12-2) cable(s). This is worth repeating because so many homeowners have made mistakes regarding this subtopic requiring stringing of more wiring to correct.

Although it may be about 24 feet between receptacles served by one particular branch circuit, a receptacle halfway in between served by another branch circuit will satisfy the 12 foot rule.

I am not sure whether any limit on the total number of outlets on a branch circuit applies to both halves of a MWBC (e.g. 14-3 cable with shared neutral) combined.

If you choose to do a MWBC, double check to be sure that the (double wide double) breaker is positioned in the panel so that you measure 240 volts between the two sides. Otherwise the current on the white wire will be the sum of the currents on the red and black wires as opposed to the difference, possibly resulting in an overload.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 01-12-19 at 07:49 AM.
  #10  
Old 01-12-19, 07:26 AM
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Couple of hints I was given is not to run a 12/2 wire on a 20A AFCI breaker since the inspector may not pass the space without a valid reason for the higher gage cable, breaker and receptacles.
This is true in Ontario.

For the comment "A section of wall more than 2' wide between doors needs a receptacle." would that apply in Ontario, Canada as well?
yes
 
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