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What would happen if i powered both speeds of a range hood fan?

What would happen if i powered both speeds of a range hood fan?

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  #1  
Old 01-18-19, 08:47 PM
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What would happen if i powered both speeds of a range hood fan?

I have a range hood fan that has two speeds. It's connected to a single pole double throw switch, so you can only power one speed at a time. What do you think would happen if I powered both at the same time in parallel, as if the switch weren't there?

Purely curious.

 
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Old 01-18-19, 09:18 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

You would eventually get smoke as the motor burned.
 
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Old 01-18-19, 09:55 PM
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thanks, and thanks!
Could i trouble someone for a high level explanation?
 
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Old 01-18-19, 09:57 PM
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That would depend on how the motor is wired.
If it is just tapped at different length of winding, it would run at low speed.
 
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Old 01-19-19, 12:58 PM
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It depends on your motor type...the most common on a range fan being a shaded pole with either two separate windings or...probably, one winding with a tap. They are normally wound together and may be connected in series for one speed and just the highest impedance part for the other speed. Or, they may use the high imp. winding for a speed and the tapped part of the winding for another speed. I don't know of any situation where they would connect them in parallel as you suggest, that would force the motor to dissipate the added heat from the current flow thru both windings, and I suspect there would be a push/pull effect on the rotor which would also increase the heat.. Lastly, if the tap is meant to be in series with another winding, as is often the case, that means it is intended to have much less voltage across it than 120v. Smoke.
If you are hoping for some type of super speed or power from such an arrangement, I think you will be disappointed.
 
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Old 01-21-19, 06:55 PM
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my mind is opened. a million thanks.
 
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