Well Pump Question

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  #1  
Old 01-24-19, 07:12 AM
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Well Pump Question

Hey, my parents got a lot of blank land lot, where there was no structures what so ever,no power lines, nothing, then i got a temporary pole put up from duke energy, which i was told was a 120v, since they dont do 240v temporary poles,

My parents got a guy to drill a well for them, about 320 ft deep, i think 1.3 hp motor, i think submerged, i dont know much about them, all i know is when i measure the voltage with my fluke volt meter on the wires going into the well pump, it is sucking 240 volts, what i am confused that, did duke energy lie to me when they told me they dont provide 220v temporary poles? or was someone smart enough to get 240 out of 120v pole?

One other thing, i can understand why they would not provide 220v temporary poles, because i cant really think of any building equipment used to construct a building running off 220v, i guess its for safely probably.

I dont need a argument if this can be done or not, i just want to understand how it could be done. It works and turns on normally.

thank you for your time.
 
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Old 01-24-19, 08:21 AM
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Submerged well pumps are normally 240 volt.
You can't get 240 volts out of 120 volts.
I have never heard of only 120 volts being supplied.
Who ever told you it was only120 volts must have misunderstood.
 
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Old 01-24-19, 11:53 AM
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then i got a temporary pole put up from duke energy, which i was told was a 120v, since they dont do 240v temporary poles,

Surely you had to have a temporary service installed on the temporary pole. You might ask the contractor who did the work for you.
 
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Old 01-24-19, 01:54 PM
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Well, it was duke energy truck, and they told me it is a 120 temp pole, unless duke energy truck people dont even know what they are putting in, i am at a loss.
 
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Old 01-24-19, 02:27 PM
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Is the drop two insulated wires and one bare metal cable? Are there three wires from the weather head? Are all three wires connected? If so it is 120/240.

Fact is standard breaker panel is 120/240. Standard drop is 120/240.

Note no drop is really 120. 120 is a product of one leg of 240 and a center tap of the secondary of the transformer (AKA Neutral are more correctly grounded conductor.).
 
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Old 01-24-19, 04:22 PM
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Is the drop two insulated wires and one bare metal cable? Are there three wires from the weather head? Are all three wires connected? If so it is 120/240.

Fact is standard breaker panel is 120/240. Standard drop is 120/240.

Note no drop is really 120. 120 is a product of one leg of 240 and a center tap of the secondary of the transformer (AKA Neutral are more correctly grounded conductor.)
based on what you said, i wounder how 12v power inverter is capable of having ground and produce 120v AC since it would not be connected and there is no 240v leg in a simple power inverter, i am talking about a true sinewave power inverter of 1000 watts or more. There is no drop either. It would then be a 240v power inverter or split phase.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 01-24-19 at 05:07 PM. Reason: Add Quote marks.
  #7  
Old 01-25-19, 02:40 PM
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Inverters are a different story as they are converting low voltage DC power into higher voltage AC power. They will output whatever they were designed and built to do.

As far as service from a power company it only comes in a 120V/240V configuration to a residential property. I suppose it's possible they only hooked up one leg of the service, which would only give you access to 120V instead of the full 240V, but that is a very strange way of doing it. If you can show us a picture inside the temp panel we can tell for sure.
 
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Old 02-06-19, 08:10 AM
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Okay, i am trying to figure out what power inverter i would need to power that well pump, the electrician put a braker box and that well pump has a dedicated double braker 20 amps, so it will take less then 3850 watts at 240 volts, but my real question is, what is the real wattage that is being drawn by that well pump, and what kind of power inverter i would need to power it.

would i need a 12v
would i need a 24v
would i need a 48v

anyone could recomend me a power inverter that i could use, i was trying to find a pure sinewave one, but those are hard to find besides aims and those dont have good reviews.

I just need to figure out how to power it if the power goes out or if there is ever a problem. I would be using 12v batteries and atleast 8 of them with solar panels, 100w solar panels and 12 of those. Since the well would only work for less then 15 min at a time, i think i could power it between charges.

thanks for your time.
 
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Old 02-08-19, 10:50 AM
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It is unlikely that a solar inverter could start a deep well pump. The inrush current demand is too high. Motors, and especially pumps with head pressure, require a surge of many times their normal running current during start-up. Breakers are designed to accommodate this, but inverters cannot. I would try to buy/rent a 5kW gasoline generator with a 240V output and give that a try. If that doesn't work a 7.5kW generator would probably do it. You'd have to fire up the generator when you need to run the pump during construction.
 
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Old 02-08-19, 01:20 PM
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Inverters are available in many sizes if you have enough money.
This site has them up 28kW.

https://www.altestore.com/store/inve...nverters-c608/
 
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Old 02-08-19, 01:37 PM
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When I started building my house, before I had the temporary power pole installed, I got 5 gallon jugs to bring water to the construction site. After seeing that one of my neighbors gave me an IBC tote which I left on a trailer on site. Once I got temporary power I was able to run the well from the saw pole.

 
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Old 02-13-19, 07:52 AM
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Inverters are available in many sizes if you have enough money.
This site has them up 28kW.

https://www.altestore.com/store/inve...nverters-c608/


Is there any pure sinewave inverters i could that dont rely on incoming house current from the energy company?
i mean can i run a inverter and power the well from like 24 trojen t-1275 batteries. I am sure under some solar panels and sunlight, aslong as the power inverter can start that motor, it could work for 20 min for me to get water, then let the batteries recharge again.

So basically i am looking for a more of grid set up. I can get solar panels and a 60 amp solar controler and i can get 24 and up to 32 12v deep cycle batteries, what i am missing is a inverter.
I dont think that 20 amp circuit braker can take more then 5000 watts surge, when it is only designed to operate at 3800 max current. I have not heard of circuit brakers allowing double current of its rated capacity as surge.
But i am not a electrician, and trying to figure this out by asking questions who might know.
 
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Old 02-13-19, 08:12 AM
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Does it really matter what Duke linemen told you. If you are reading 240v with your Fluke and the pump is a 240v design, aren't you good to go?
 
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Old 02-15-19, 03:44 PM
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i like to be prepared ... there is no guarantee of power 100% from the power company, anything can cause interruptions.

i was just asking for help, no need to be rude about it.
 
  #15  
Old 02-15-19, 07:58 PM
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If you measured 240 volts at the temporary panel on the pole then you have 120/240 volts there.

Does the temporary hookup have several receptacles, with more than one prong hole pattern?

Did you plug the pump cord into a receptacle or did you hard wire the pump cord wire ends to lugs or screw terminals inside the panel?
 
 

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