GFCI outlets


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Old 02-04-19, 07:55 AM
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GFCI outlets

Can I install a 15 amp GFCI in a kitchen and bathroom that only has 2 wires and no ground and still have protection?
 
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Old 02-04-19, 08:55 AM
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Yes, definitely.
..........................
 
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Old 02-04-19, 09:14 AM
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You can install it for GFCI protection but it will not provide the same protection as running a ground wire. This is commonly done in older homes without grounded receptacles in lieu of rewiring the whole house. GCFI receptacle should come with a label indicating no ground and this should be applied to the outside so it's visible if it's being used in place of a two-prong receptacle.
 
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Old 02-10-19, 06:45 AM
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I hope it's OK to add to this with other GFCI questions.

My whole house (except the kitchen which I rewired) is wired with 2 wire no ground wire. If I add GFCI outlets on other branches in the house, can I use the downstream LOAD connections or does every box need a GFCI receptacle?

I've read that you are not to connect the GFCI ground and neutral in the box. But why not? If the appliance fails with a hot to ground fault, the appliance housing is hot. With a path from ground to neutral in the box, the breaker would trip. Otherwise, the appliance housing remains hot.

Finally, just because I've always wondered and prefer not to try it myself, if I touch the hot of a CFGI receptacle and ground would I feel anything as the GFCI (hopefully!) trips? I know if you touch the hot and neutral of the GFCI you get just as shocked as any other receptacle.

Thank you
 
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Old 02-10-19, 10:08 AM
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You can use the downstream LOAD terminals. You are supposed also label all the downstream receptacles 'GFCI protected NO ground'.
 
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Old 02-10-19, 10:21 AM
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Bill...... your logic is flawed.

The GFI is only providing shock protection to ground. It cannot determine an overcurrent or short condition.

Neutral and ground are only connected at the panel. If you were to use the neutral as the ground also on a GFI receptacle and the neutral opened..... now the neutral wire would become hot and so would the GFI ground.

A GFI is looking for an imbalance between hot and neutral. So if you install a GFI receptacle in a room where there was nothing grounded and the floor was insulated...... the GFI could never trip as there would never be an imbalance or leakage to ground.

You could possibly feel a tingle from hot to ground before the GFI trips.
 
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Old 02-11-19, 06:23 PM
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The GFI is only providing shock protection to ground. It cannot determine an overcurrent or short condition.

I believe a GFCI receptacle would trip on a direct short to ground. The hot wire would be delivering current that the neutral wire would not be returning to the panel and I believe that would trip the GFCI receptacle. However, I haven't tested my theory.
 
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Old 02-11-19, 08:05 PM
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GFCI would trip on a short to ground but it would not trip on an over current such as 30 amp flowing hot to neutral.
 
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Old 02-12-19, 08:20 AM
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GFCI would trip on a short to ground but it would not trip on an over current such as 30 amp flowing hot to neutral.

But the circuit breaker should trip on the over current condition.
 
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Old 02-12-19, 09:15 AM
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But the circuit breaker should trip on the over current condition.
True. But not the GFCI.............................
 
 

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