Kitchen Circuit 30 amp Breaker

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Old 02-07-19, 10:26 AM
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Kitchen Circuit 30 amp Breaker

When we built our house there was no electricity available so I started to wire the house for a 12 volt system. Before the 12 volt system was put to use electricity became available. I had run a single 8/3 ga cable to the kitchen area for the 12 volt system and that circuit now has a 20 amp breaker. Now many years later the microwave and our new Instant Pot can't be running at the same time. The wiring could certainly handle more amps and I have considered replacing the 20 amp breaker with a 30 amp breaker. Yes I know this is against code and I probably won't do it but is there any other alternative other than running a new circuit?
 
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Old 02-07-19, 10:59 AM
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Yes...... you could install a small sub panel at the end of the 8/3. Put a 2P40A in the main panel. Then you could take off several circuits.
 
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Old 02-07-19, 11:04 AM
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What Pjmax said or you could install a double pole 20 amp breaker and have two 20 amp circuits. Put the microwave and Instant Pot on separate 20 amp circuits.
 
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Old 02-07-19, 03:49 PM
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I posted this topic and I made a stupid mistake in describing my situation. I am used to marine wiring and in that realm 12/2 is two conductors so I said I had 8/3 going to my kitchen when in reality it is two wires plus a ground. It took me a while to figure out what the two replies were talking about, it didn't make sense to me. Thank you for the replies though.
 
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Old 02-07-19, 05:06 PM
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In that case neither option suggested will work. You are face with pulling in new cables for new circuits.
 
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Old 02-07-19, 07:06 PM
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If the cable has two 8 gauge wires, black and white respectively, and a ground wire at least 10 gauge then you can still have a subpanel with multiple 20 amp. sub-subcircuits, either two or three of them.
 
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Old 02-07-19, 08:32 PM
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But it would be a 120v only breaker panel.
 
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Old 02-08-19, 06:24 AM
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Planning for the future you will need to run more cables.

Ultimately you need two 20 amp circuits serving kitchen and dining room receptacles only. The (120 volt only) subpanel accepting the existing 8-2 cable can power those two circuits only, or IMHO power one of the dining circuits and two 15 amp general purpose circuits with lights.

For the future new cables would power lights, other rooms, etc. and possibly one of the official kitchen 20 amp circuits.
 
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