Garage Door wiring parallel to 120v circuit...

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Old 03-03-19, 06:17 PM
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Garage Door wiring parallel to 120v circuit...

Is it ok to run 18g thermostat (garage door sensor) wire through the same joist holes as the regular wiring across the garage ceiling? Is there any code against this? Is there any danger to it? I read that there's no NEC code against it, as long as it's not in a "raceway" or "manhole", but every garage door opener manual I see says not to do it. What gives?

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Brian
 
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Old 03-03-19, 07:55 PM
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The garage door sensor wire is usually un-shielded. Running it next to regular electrical wire "could" interfere with the sensors signal to the garage door opener. Thus causing a dangerous situation if a small child or animal skipped the sensor, but the opener did not register the signal.

You could replace the "thermostat" wire with shielded wire, or drill a 3/16ths hole for the wire several inches away from the electrical wire.
 
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Old 03-03-19, 08:12 PM
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Bit confused as to the "shielded" aspect.. Where would I even find 18/2 shielded wire? Would that be a metal sheath inside the plastic? This is the wire I have:

https://www.amazon.com/Southwire-641.../dp/B0069F4H0E

Romex being close to this would interfere with the signal? Even where they cross perpendicular? Or only when running parallel?

Thanks,
Brian
 
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Old 03-04-19, 05:06 AM
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Hi, are you running these cables above a finished ceiling?
Geo
 
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Old 03-04-19, 05:10 AM
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You're allowed to run the signal cable next to the power cable per NEC, and I've seen it done 1000 times with garage doors and HVAC. There is a theoretical chance of interference causing it not to work.

Shielded cable has a foil wrapper between the conductors and the outer jacket which is shunted to ground on one side when installed correctly. NASA would probably install the garage door this way.
 
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Old 03-04-19, 11:58 AM
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@geo - The ceiling isn't finished yet, but it will be. Currently just open joists.

@ib - so basically it's fine? lol
 
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Old 03-04-19, 12:54 PM
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If you donít have full access to the space above you could run a piece of strapping on top and staple the cables to it, no need to drill holes.
Geo
 
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Old 03-04-19, 05:02 PM
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There are no danger as long as the splice is not made in a same junction box. Running low voltage wire next to line voltage wire is electrically safe.
If that low voltage line is a data line, then there can be interference issues, but garage door opener wire and sensor wires are just a dumb, simple low voltage switch circuit. There are no data communication going on and will not interfere with sensor at all.
No need for shielded cable.
 
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