Moving service panel box

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  #1  
Old 04-19-19, 09:04 AM
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Moving service panel box

My first post – relocation of service panel box:

Our house is 90 years old, and the service panel box is in a corner of the basement where the old fuse box was once located. The box is behind a wall of studs and dry wall. There is access to the box provided by a small hinged door in the wall.

I want to relocate the box, not left or right, but rather, install a new box, forward, mounted on a plywood panel mounted on the finished wall. Thus, the panel box would be openly accessible rather than located behind the wall.

I will have more than 36 inches clearance in front of the box, with an area 31” wide and 41” high for the plywood on which to mount the new panel box which is 15”wide and 20” high. This seems to me to comply with the code.

Problem is that there are 23 lines feeding the circuits to the house, and those lines are not long enough to reach the relocated box. I would need to use use 4”x4” junction boxes and jumper from them to the new box. The jumper boxes would be attached to the plywood and fed from behind. They would need to be placed within 2”-3” from the new panel box. If I run three lines into each jumper box, and splice each to go to the new panel box, I would need eight boxes to accommodate all of the lines.

I can’t think of any other way to do this without tearing the whole wall apart. Will this pass muster with the code?

Any help is appreciated.
 
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Old 04-19-19, 11:18 AM
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I'm not sure if I fully understand all your issues, but off hand I can't think of something against code in what you're proposing.
An alternative would be to use a couple of wiring gutters/troughs such as this:

https://www.gamut.com/p/raintight-wiring-trough-galvanized-24-in-interior-wd-4-in-interior-ht-Njk2NTc=

It would cost more and require quite a bit of work with a knockout punch, but I think the result would be better and I suspect an inspector would think so too.
 
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Old 04-19-19, 01:36 PM
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You could gut the existing box and use it for your splices. You will need to run a new feed from the meter because it can't be spliced.
 
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Old 04-19-19, 01:39 PM
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Hi, a trough seems like they way to go, post some pics so we can see what you have there.
This trough already has knock outs, just pop them out.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/WIEGMANN...24RC/202097235
Geo
 
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Old 04-19-19, 01:55 PM
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I got the impression that the poster would want knockouts on the back of wall of the trough, but he'd have to clarify what he needs

It sounds like leaving the existing box would make it unaccessable with the proposal to put a new panel on plywood right in front of the old space. Again, the poster would have to clarify his constraints and what he wants to do.
 
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Old 04-19-19, 03:52 PM
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A picture would be a big help but I think I know what you have and are doing. Your old panel is mounted probably on a cement or stone basement wall. You finished the room by building a wall in front of that and added a peek-a-boo door in the new wall to get to the old panel.

The problem here is how to get to all the cables. My last customer that wanted this done..... I told him to make a small closet instead of bringing the panel out. On a 90 year old house you're going to have a lot of fun with the old cables and working thru a hole in the wall is not going to be easy.
 
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Old 04-19-19, 08:28 PM
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Thanks you guys for your responses.
I did take a picture and will post it. However, it’s late Friday night and our kids are coming for the weekend. I think I found a solution, and will post, with picture, this coming Tuesday.
Happy Easter to all.
Ron
 
  #8  
Old 04-25-19, 08:41 AM
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Sorry for not posting this sooner.
Moving box forward about 12 inches. All lines to house circuits will not reach new box, so will need some jumpers. Until power is cut, and I can untangle the mess in existing box, i can't determine how many jumpers will be needed. Might not be practical to do this way.

Plan B might be better. Existing box is at corner of two walls. i could mount new box on corner of other wall. Would have good access to fish jumpers to that point. Then i could use existing panel box as a junction box because it would have access through existing peep hole door.

Can't tell until I begin. Thanks again for all the responses.
 
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Old 04-25-19, 10:02 AM
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Are you intending to keep the service disconnect/overcurrent protection (e.g., main breaker) in the original panel? Unless, of course, it's outside the house.
The reason I mention this is there's a limitation on the length of service conductors allowed within a building, typically 5 feet.
 
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