Will a generator run an electric oven?

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  #1  
Old 04-22-19, 08:06 PM
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Will a generator run an electric oven?

Basically what i would like to be able to do is run a old household Hotpoint electric oven outside in my shop on a generator. According to the label its 10 KW (120/240V) 8KW 120/208V) and the bake unit uses 2585 watts and the broil unit uses 3410 watts. For my use i would be baking at 400-450F for around an hour. I know amperage is the big issue here but from the specs i listed does it sound like a 4000 watt 33/17 amp (240/120V) generator might run it? Or my other alternative is if the shop panel has enough juice. Its a 50 amp 10/3 run about 100' long but it shares a circuit with the water well pump.
 
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Old 04-22-19, 08:17 PM
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Also if it makes a difference the plug on the oven according to a chart i was glancing at is a 10-50P.
 
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Old 04-22-19, 09:25 PM
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So long as your generator can supply enough power yes it will work.
10kW generator is pretty big generator and will run your oven. However, a gas oven on propane is probably a better option.
Most oven and ranges comes with orifice that you can use to convert to propane.
 
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Old 04-22-19, 10:26 PM
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The 10KW is what the stove/oven is rated at on 120/240 and 8KW on 120/208 (whatever that is). I think that's what it would use if all 4 range burners are cranked up + the oven on broil all at the same time. My generator is only 4000 running watts 5000 max. Definitely not enough watts to run all of that but I'm wondering if it will just run the oven. The wattage seems right but I'm not quite sure how many amps the oven will draw by itself. I'm assuming the 33/17 rating on my generator means it can handle 33 amps 240 volt and 17 amps 120 volt. Is 33 amps enough to run a oven? Normally in a house I believe it gets it's own 40-50 amp breaker. Also I forgot to mention the reason I can't use a gas or propane stove is I'm using it for baking powder coated parts. It's highly flammable and can cause a fire/explosion In a gas stove.
 
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Old 04-22-19, 11:06 PM
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the shop panel has enough juice. Its a 50 amp 10/3 run about 100' long
If you mean it is protected by a 50 amp breaker that is wrong. Maximum breaker you can use for #10 is 30 amp. Since the current set up is wrong I sugest you change it so it will support the oven.
 
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Old 04-23-19, 12:38 AM
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bake unit uses 2585 watts and the broil unit uses 3410 watts.
You've pretty much stated the wattage you'll need to bake only. You may have to disconnect the broiler element as some ovens preheat with both or cycle them.

It's something you'll need to confirm in operation.
 
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Old 04-23-19, 04:56 AM
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I'm assuming the 33/17 rating on my generator means it can handle 33 amps 240 volt and 17 amps 120 volt.
You have the amps backwards. The 33A is at 120V, and the 17A is at 240V. The way you had it, 33A at 240V, is 7920W, which is WAY over the rating of your generator. 33A @ 120V is 3960W, and 17A @ 240V is 4080W.

BTW, that's a lot of generator just to run an oven. I would suggest a gas grill for cooking during a power outage.
 
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Old 04-23-19, 05:21 AM
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I'm guessing you're doing some powder coating with this. Yes I think your generator will be able to run the oven. As Pete said you might need to fiddle with the elements a little, but it should work.

If your generator is low on power (engine wise) it might stall. Those ratings are new in the lab. If you've got old gas or badly tuned carb you won't get the full wattage out of it.
 
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Old 04-23-19, 08:55 AM
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So a 10# is not a large enough gauge for a 50A circuit? As far as i know it starts as a 50A in the main panel. Then goes for a 100' run into the shop were its then split into two legs (15A ea). One for the shop receptacles the other for the shop lights.

Its all for powdering coating parts so i just need to have use of the bake function. I'll definitely be taking out the broil element as someone suggested to use less power as well.

Also is wattage directly related to amperage? Will X amount of watts being drawn always = X Amount of amps? Now that someone has clearly explained to me that my generator has a 17A at 240V is that going to be enough or am i looking at a aspect that doesn't really matter. For example if my generator is 4000 watts which is roughly 17 amps at 240V. does that mean on 240V if im drawing less then 4000 watts it will always be using less then 17 amps? Is that the concept here?

If thats the case and im actually supplying more power then i need with the generator. Then i have another generator i can use thats a little smaller. Its around 14A 3000 watts or so.
 
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Old 04-23-19, 09:04 AM
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Yes, #10 is good for only 30 amps. I would almost bet the feed was originally intended only for the well pump but was later expanded to the shop. If you reduce the breaker to the original size you may not have enough for the shop. How many amps does the pump draw?
 

Last edited by ray2047; 04-23-19 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 04-23-19, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by SkyWil
the reason I can't use a gas or propane stove is I'm using it for baking powder coated parts. It's highly flammable and can cause a fire/explosion In a gas stove.
What size are the parts being powder-coated?
Smaller than a large thanksgiving turkey?

It might be easier to get a 22-quart electric roaster oven,
they heat to 450 degrees and runs off of 120v, and have no exposed hot element.

I found that covering the roaster with a thermal blanket GREATLY improved the heating and heat retention, and lowered the total current usage.
 
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Old 04-23-19, 10:41 AM
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Amps, Volts and Watts are related by the formula Watts = Volts * Amps or any variation like Amps = Watts / Volts

Most of the time with electrical equipment you want to run it at about 80% for long-term use. That's why your generator manufacturer will lists the peak 5000W and continuous 4000W power separately to account for this.

The generator only produces what you actually use. If you only plug in 500W it will only produce 500W, plus a little overhead to account for friction loss in the engine and alternator, heat, voltage drop, etc. There is a mechanical governor on the generator engine that adjusts to match the actual load.
 
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Old 04-23-19, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks
Watts = Volts * Amps or any variation like Amps = Watts / Volts
W=VxA
also

V=OxA
replace V in top equation

W=OxAxA
 
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