Question About 220V Breaker For Outside Circuit

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-23-19, 09:09 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 31
Question About 220V Breaker For Outside Circuit

Hello,

I am having a 220V circuit installed in my yard (for a pump) and I have a question about the required breaker(s). The pump contractor who installed the 4" x 4" post with sub-panel in my yard has indicated it will require 220V service using 10-3 direct burial (UF).

Once I go out and get quotes from the different electricians to install the 220V service, I'm wondering if a GFCI breaker required in the electrical panel in the basement? Or whether one is needed in the sub panel?

Basically I want to make sure that when I get my quotes, that each of the electricians are quoting apples to apples 'and' that it is done properly.

Thanks in advance!
 
Attached Images  
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-23-19, 09:25 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 50,096
Likes Received: 75
What kind of pump is this ? Well pump..... submersible pump ?

A 240v pump should only need 10-2 w/gr UF as there is no neutral which means three wire is not required. Typically this type of pump on a 240v circuit would not require GFI protection.
 
  #3  
Old 04-23-19, 09:31 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 31
Thanks for the quick reply... this is a sewer grinder pump. The company installing the pump indicated it requires 240V and based on the distance, needs to be 10-3.
 
  #4  
Old 04-23-19, 09:37 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 50,096
Likes Received: 75
That does not require GFI protection. If the pump was listed as 120/240v then it would require 10/3. A straight 240v pump does not require a neutral. 10/2 or 10/3 are both rated for the same current and the voltage drop will be the same on both cables.

Unless the pump specifically requires 10/3 for some reason...... it should not be required.
 
  #5  
Old 04-23-19, 09:44 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 31
Thanks for this.... I'm not sure if it is 120/240, or straight 240 - either way, I will have the electricians quote 10-3.
 
  #6  
Old 04-23-19, 09:46 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,567
Likes Received: 7
The company installing the pump indicated it requires 240V and based on the distance, needs to be 10-3.
A 120/2240 sub panel would need 10-3 but why do you even need a sub panel? If only a 240 pump you only need 10-2 and a disconnect at the most. Sounds like the installer isn't very savvy about electric.

What make and model pump? Is there any other equipment being supplied by the subpanel.

Don't ask the electrician to quote what the installer said. Ask the electrician what you need and quote that.,
 
  #7  
Old 04-24-19, 07:41 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 31
ray2047 - I think I may have misspoken... I think at the post it might be just a disconnect. As far as the make and model of the pump, I'm not sure, but the pump installation contractor certainly knows this info.
 
  #8  
Old 04-24-19, 08:12 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,567
Likes Received: 7
Post a picture of what is on the pole with cover removed. How to Insert pictures

We can verify if it is a disconnect. You only need 10-2 UF-b for a disconnect.
 
  #9  
Old 04-24-19, 09:30 AM
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 44
The pump itself may not require a neutral, but it would be prudent to pull neutral as well, in order to power other devices near the equipment (perhaps in the future), such as:
  • A 120V convenience receptacle
  • Some lights
  • A pump alarm
  • A pump controller
  • Etc

One additional option to consider. Instead of mounting the sub-panel on a post near the equipment, you could alternately mount the sub-panel at your house, and only mount the outdoor receptacle enclosure near the equipment. That way you could flip the breakers from your house without walking all the way across your yard to the pump.

A side note: While the nameplate or instruction manual of the pump may say that it is a "220V" motor, the service you are installing is always "240V".
 
  #10  
Old 04-26-19, 01:53 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 31
ray2047 - I will upload a picture on Monday with the cover removed.

Electric_dummy - I think you might have hit the nail on the head... now that you mention it, I know there is a pump alarm, etc in the event that there is a backup.

In terms of moving the 'sub-panel', I think it is now too late for that. The panel is about 40' away from the house.

Yes, thank you for the clarification on 220V vs 240V.
 
  #11  
Old 04-26-19, 03:02 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,567
Likes Received: 7
I am probably outside my knowledge range so please disregard my questions.
 
  #12  
Old 05-11-19, 11:09 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 1
Arrow Read about CB

I would suggest you the following read:

Circuit Breaker Schematic Diagram | Electrical Academia
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes