Regular Outlet to GFCI

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Old 05-13-19, 04:44 PM
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Regular Outlet to GFCI

I have a question on switching out a regular outlet to a GFCI when the regular outlet had four wires (two neutrals and two hot. Hopefully what I did was correct, but I wanted to ask here. Basically, I wired the GFCI outlet the exact same way as the old non-GFCI outlet. so the top white and black went to the top white and black locations on the GFCI and the bottom two went to the bottom two. I know the top of the GFCI is line and bottom is load. The GFCI outlet seems to work fine and I am not positive what is downstream of the old (and now new GFCI outlet. I just bought the condo and during inspection, the inspector just recommended replacing the regular outlet with a GFCI. Any confirmation or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks much.
 
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Old 05-13-19, 04:53 PM
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If it's to be a standalone GFCI outlet then all wires connect to the line side. The load side is used to provide GFCI protection to other downstream outlets.
 
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Old 05-13-19, 04:56 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

If you have just wanted that one location to have GFI protection..... then the two whites and the two blacks should have all been connected to the LINE side. The LOAD side should have remained taped over and unused.

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Old 05-14-19, 08:34 AM
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I guess a clarifying item is that if a regular outlet is hooked up with two neutrals and two hots with the connection tab intact between the upper and lower sets, that would have to indicate that there is load passing by that outlet, correct? So, if I wired the GFCI the exact same way, this load would also pass by it but be protected by the GFCI. There is nothing wrong with that or dangerous is there? The think is as I just got the place, I do not know where the load goes downstream (if at all), I am thinking to another outlet/switch. I guess I could trip the GFCI and see where else power was lost by experimentation at each outlet and switch.
 
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Old 05-14-19, 09:22 AM
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Yes it's standard practice to feed downstream outlets via the screws and tabs on receptacles.

GFCI receptacles also provide this capability either with GFCI protection (using LOAD screws) or without GFCI protection (using LINE screws). The screw plates on GFCI devices are capable of holding up to two wires each to make this possible.

Trial and error is really the only good way to find out what is wired downstream of this receptacle.
 
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Old 05-14-19, 10:19 AM
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As Ben mentioned you can use the GFI receptacle to protect downstream receptacles.

In order for you do that.... you'd need to know which pair is the line/hot wire and which set is the load pair. The pair that is hot must go on the LINE side for the GFI to work properly.
 
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Old 05-14-19, 11:17 AM
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Great, thank you all very much for the info.
 
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